Confirming the efficacy of the Chrysalis Lite programme for prison rehabilitation and contributing to the expansion

Impact: Social impacts, Health and Well-Being impacts, 04: Quality Education (UN SDG), 10: Reduced Inequalities (UN SDG), 08: Decent Work and Economic Growth (UN SDG), 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities (UN SDG)

Description of impact

Tackling high re-offending rates in England and Wales is of significant political interest, with education and training being viewed as an important mechanism to achieve change. The research offered insight into an unreported area of good practice in prison rehabilitation provision through its evaluation of the Chrysalis Lite programme. It demonstrated that the programme helped participants develop life skills, including greater self-awareness, problem-solving, critical thinking and interpersonal skills. Based on Michelle's research, the efficacy of Chrysalis Lite programme was confirmed, directly leading to its expansion to two further prisons in the area. The intention of this expansion was to confirm whether the programme could assist with the reduction in prison violence through improved thinking skills, communication and problem solving.

Stakeholders/Beneficiaries

Prisoners, prison staff

How have research outputs led to this impact?

Michelle conducted a small empirical study examining the Chrysalis Lite life skills programme delivered in a Category C prison in the West Midlands. The study used a multi-method approach incorporating observations of two modules, four focus groups with prisoners enrolled on the programme, questionnaires with programme completers, and semi-structured interviews with staff. The findings indicate that life skills are an important component in rehabilitation. More specifically, developing the necessary tools to assist prisoners in everyday life, such as recognition, interpretation, reflection, response, and planning is fundamental to rehabilitation. The key message of this study is that without addressing basic life skills, education and vocational rehabilitation is severely limited. To reduce reoffending rates, it is important to conceive rehabilitation in broader terms, not simply in relation to education and vocational training.
Impact statusCompleted
Impact date2016
Category of impactSocial impacts, Health and Well-Being impacts, 04: Quality Education (UN SDG), 10: Reduced Inequalities (UN SDG), 08: Decent Work and Economic Growth (UN SDG), 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities (UN SDG)