“A certain resemblance”: negotiating Africa as abjection within and without in H.P. Lovecraft’s “Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family” and “Under the Pyramids”

Research output: Contribution to Book/ReportChapterpeer-review

Abstract

In this article I examine the manner in which H.P. Lovecraft depicts the African subcontinent and its peoples in two of his short stories: “Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family” (1921) and “Under the Pyramids” (1924). Through close textual analysis I argue that Lovecraft’s fears of both non-Western peoples and the racial degeneracy that might arise as a result of miscegenation, indicate a writer who has been, at least partially, influenced by contemporary nationalist discourses that presented racial integration as a significant taboo.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCritical Engagements 2.1
Subtitle of host publicationA Journal of Criticism and Theory
EditorsSteven Barfield, Dr Lawrence Phillips, Philip Tew
PublisherUK Network for Modern Fiction Studies
Chapter2
Pages59-83
Number of pages25
Volume2
Edition1
ISBN (Print)9780953801725
Publication statusPublished - 21 Apr 2010

Publication series

NameCritical Engagements
ISSN (Print)1754-0984

Bibliographical note

ISSN: 1754-0984

Keywords

  • Language and Literature
  • American Literature
  • Africa

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