An evaluation of a Singing for the Brain pilot with people with a learning disability and memory problems or a dementia

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Abstract

This paper presents the findings from a pilot project introducing Singing for the Brain into care centres with people with a learning disability and a form of dementia or memory problem. Through participant observations, patient and staff feedback, there was strong support for the use of Singing for the Brain with this client group, with articipants reporting high levels of enjoyment and engagement in the sessions. The potential for these sessions to support communication, memory, social engagement and choice was reported by staff and articipants. Whilst anecdotal reports also suggested the sessions had a positive impact on elevating mood over a sustained period of time. The pilot sessions are discussed in reference to the regular sessions run for people with dementia and comparisons drawn across the two approaches. Further evidence is required to understand the potential impact on participant’s well-being from attending these sessions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)360-374
JournalDementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice
Volume16
Issue number3
Early online date8 Jul 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2017

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Singing
Learning Disorders
Dementia
Brain
Communication

Keywords

  • Singing for the Brain
  • dementia
  • learning disability
  • memory
  • music

Cite this

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abstract = "This paper presents the findings from a pilot project introducing Singing for the Brain into care centres with people with a learning disability and a form of dementia or memory problem. Through participant observations, patient and staff feedback, there was strong support for the use of Singing for the Brain with this client group, with articipants reporting high levels of enjoyment and engagement in the sessions. The potential for these sessions to support communication, memory, social engagement and choice was reported by staff and articipants. Whilst anecdotal reports also suggested the sessions had a positive impact on elevating mood over a sustained period of time. The pilot sessions are discussed in reference to the regular sessions run for people with dementia and comparisons drawn across the two approaches. Further evidence is required to understand the potential impact on participant’s well-being from attending these sessions.",
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