Attitudes to expert systems: a card sort study

Mike Curran, Gordon Rugg, Susan Corr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: It is sometimes difficult to make a diagnosis in podiatry and expert systems may help to improve the situation. Card Sorts Methodology may be a useful technique to explore attitudes towards the use of expert systems within a domain. Although card sorts have been widely used for decades, they have tended to be viewed as an informal technique for intial exploration. More recent work in knowlegde acquisition and in requirements acquisition has changed the situation by developing more powerful, formalized versions of card sorts. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate podiatrists' perceptions of expert systems in relation to their perceptions of other diagnostic aids. Method: Two groups of seven participants composed of Podiatry lecturers and Nursing lecturers were asked to sort cards containing various diagnostic aids. Results: Expert systems are viewed as very different in kind from the other diagnostic aids
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)190-197
Number of pages8
JournalThe Foot
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2005

Fingerprint

Expert Systems
Podiatry
Nursing

Cite this

Curran, Mike ; Rugg, Gordon ; Corr, Susan. / Attitudes to expert systems: a card sort study. In: The Foot. 2005 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 190-197.
@article{8b74ca87544a4806a3338ae6f17576c3,
title = "Attitudes to expert systems: a card sort study",
abstract = "Background: It is sometimes difficult to make a diagnosis in podiatry and expert systems may help to improve the situation. Card Sorts Methodology may be a useful technique to explore attitudes towards the use of expert systems within a domain. Although card sorts have been widely used for decades, they have tended to be viewed as an informal technique for intial exploration. More recent work in knowlegde acquisition and in requirements acquisition has changed the situation by developing more powerful, formalized versions of card sorts. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate podiatrists' perceptions of expert systems in relation to their perceptions of other diagnostic aids. Method: Two groups of seven participants composed of Podiatry lecturers and Nursing lecturers were asked to sort cards containing various diagnostic aids. Results: Expert systems are viewed as very different in kind from the other diagnostic aids",
author = "Mike Curran and Gordon Rugg and Susan Corr",
year = "2005",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.foot.2005.07.001",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "190--197",
journal = "The Foot",
issn = "0958-2592",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "4",

}

Attitudes to expert systems: a card sort study. / Curran, Mike; Rugg, Gordon; Corr, Susan.

In: The Foot, Vol. 15, No. 4, 01.12.2005, p. 190-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Attitudes to expert systems: a card sort study

AU - Curran, Mike

AU - Rugg, Gordon

AU - Corr, Susan

PY - 2005/12/1

Y1 - 2005/12/1

N2 - Background: It is sometimes difficult to make a diagnosis in podiatry and expert systems may help to improve the situation. Card Sorts Methodology may be a useful technique to explore attitudes towards the use of expert systems within a domain. Although card sorts have been widely used for decades, they have tended to be viewed as an informal technique for intial exploration. More recent work in knowlegde acquisition and in requirements acquisition has changed the situation by developing more powerful, formalized versions of card sorts. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate podiatrists' perceptions of expert systems in relation to their perceptions of other diagnostic aids. Method: Two groups of seven participants composed of Podiatry lecturers and Nursing lecturers were asked to sort cards containing various diagnostic aids. Results: Expert systems are viewed as very different in kind from the other diagnostic aids

AB - Background: It is sometimes difficult to make a diagnosis in podiatry and expert systems may help to improve the situation. Card Sorts Methodology may be a useful technique to explore attitudes towards the use of expert systems within a domain. Although card sorts have been widely used for decades, they have tended to be viewed as an informal technique for intial exploration. More recent work in knowlegde acquisition and in requirements acquisition has changed the situation by developing more powerful, formalized versions of card sorts. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate podiatrists' perceptions of expert systems in relation to their perceptions of other diagnostic aids. Method: Two groups of seven participants composed of Podiatry lecturers and Nursing lecturers were asked to sort cards containing various diagnostic aids. Results: Expert systems are viewed as very different in kind from the other diagnostic aids

U2 - 10.1016/j.foot.2005.07.001

DO - 10.1016/j.foot.2005.07.001

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 190

EP - 197

JO - The Foot

JF - The Foot

SN - 0958-2592

IS - 4

ER -