Being resilient: business continuity principles for vetinary practice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This short article will summarise the key principles of business continuity (BC) and demonstrate how a lean and practical version of these can help enhance any veterinary practice to be prepared for and resilient to disruption. The causes of disruption (and the kinds of additional or alternative resource and specialist support needed) are many and unpredictable – so agility, adaptation and simple scenario exercises as part of the normal business planning of a practice are needed. No matter what the cause – fire, flood, reputational issue, animal pandemic disease, staff shortage – the business needs to thrive despite turbulence. By thinking ahead, working through consequences and embedding flexibility in the business – interruptions can be minimised, brands protected, liabilities limited and continuity assured.
Original languageEnglish
JournalIn Practice
Volume38
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2016

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liability
turbulence
resource
animal disease
planning

Keywords

  • Business continuity
  • risk management
  • crisis management
  • competitive advantage

Cite this

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Being resilient: business continuity principles for vetinary practice. / Hills, Mils; Hills, Mils (Editor).

In: In Practice, Vol. 38, No. 10, 01.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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