"By Jupiter's cock!" Spartacus: Blood and Sand, video games, and camp excess

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapter

Abstract

This chapter examines Starz network's Spartacus: Blood and Sand exploring its position as one of the first examples of television that “remediates” (to borrow a term from Bolter and Grusin) aspects of video-games to create an aesthetic of 'camp' excess. The chapter argues that the show’s continued reliance on the camp excesses of video-game aesthetic and narrative conventions results in a program that remains unusual in the contemporary television landscape for acknowledging and foregrounding its own artificiality. Furthermore I discuss whether the show's commercial success in reaching an audience familiar with such populist and critically elided conventions suggests a need for a re-assessment of entrenched hegemonic approaches to television studies, one that recognises the increasingly synergistic and digitised nature of contemporary television.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOf Muscles and Men: Essays on the Sword and Sandal Film
EditorsMichael G Cornelius
Place of PublicationNorth Carolina
PublisherMcFarland
Pages144-153
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9780786489022
ISBN (Print)9780786461622
Publication statusPublished - 15 Sep 2011

Fingerprint

Excess
Video Games
Blood
Aesthetics
Reliance
Artificiality
Populist
Foregrounding

Keywords

  • Video
  • Games
  • Film
  • Popular Culture
  • Performing Arts

Cite this

Simmons, D. (2011). "By Jupiter's cock!" Spartacus: Blood and Sand, video games, and camp excess. In M. G. Cornelius (Ed.), Of Muscles and Men: Essays on the Sword and Sandal Film (pp. 144-153). North Carolina: McFarland.
Simmons, David. / "By Jupiter's cock!" Spartacus: Blood and Sand, video games, and camp excess. Of Muscles and Men: Essays on the Sword and Sandal Film. editor / Michael G Cornelius. North Carolina : McFarland, 2011. pp. 144-153
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Simmons, D 2011, "By Jupiter's cock!" Spartacus: Blood and Sand, video games, and camp excess. in MG Cornelius (ed.), Of Muscles and Men: Essays on the Sword and Sandal Film. McFarland, North Carolina, pp. 144-153.

"By Jupiter's cock!" Spartacus: Blood and Sand, video games, and camp excess. / Simmons, David.

Of Muscles and Men: Essays on the Sword and Sandal Film. ed. / Michael G Cornelius. North Carolina : McFarland, 2011. p. 144-153.

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapter

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Simmons D. "By Jupiter's cock!" Spartacus: Blood and Sand, video games, and camp excess. In Cornelius MG, editor, Of Muscles and Men: Essays on the Sword and Sandal Film. North Carolina: McFarland. 2011. p. 144-153