Can’t dance without being drunk? Exploring the enjoyment and acceptability of conscious clubbing in young people

Emma Davies, Smith Joanne, Matthias Johansson, Kimberley Hill, Kyle Brown

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Recently, there has been an emerging interest in alcohol-free music and dancing events within the UK, for example Morning Gloryville, which began in London in 2013 and claims to be the first to bring ‘conscious clubbing’ to the masses. In 2016, they received an award from Alcohol Concern at the ZERO Alcohol Awards for ‘Best Zero Alcohol Initiative’. Dance events like these provide a temporary escape, full of sensation and new experiences (e.g. Firat & Dholokia, 1998; Goulding, Shankar, & Elliott, 2002). Dancing has been found to be inherently rewarding and it associated with positive experiences, such as increased wellbeing (; Thomson & Jaque, 2012). Studies have also shown that taking part in physical group activities such as dancing may promote altruistic behaviors, social cohesion and wellbeing (Fischer, Callander, Reddish, & Bulbulia, 2013; Lakens & Stel, 2011:0 Bernardi NF, Bellemare-Pepin A and Peretz I (2017)). Electronic dance music (EDM) participants also express deeper reasons for engaging in these events, such as identity formation and change, a deeper sense of belonging in this world and also of transcendence and flow experiences (Goulding, Shankar, & Elliott, 2002; Jaimangal-Jones, Pritchard, & Morgan, 2009; Johner, 2015). Self-expression and identity formation are further expressed for these individuals as part of pre-event rituals and associated branding or clothing. Our project aimed to examine whether promotion of alcohol-free events may serve as a better harm reduction strategy than attempting to persuade students to reduce alcohol consumption. This chapter will integrate the emerging research evidence about experiences of alcohol free events together with research on the benefits of dancing. We will report findings from our own mixed methods study, as well as outline future avenues for research in this new field.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationYoung Adult Drinking Styles: Current Perspectives on Research, Policy and Practice
EditorsDominic Conroy, Fiona Measham
PublisherPalgrave Macmilan
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-030-28607-1
ISBN (Print)978-3-030-28606-4
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019

Fingerprint

dance
alcohol
event
identity formation
experience
music
altruistic behavior
transcendence
social cohesion
clothing
alcohol consumption
religious behavior
promotion
electronics
evidence
Group
student

Keywords

  • Drinking
  • Alcohol
  • Wellbeing
  • Health psychology
  • Psychology

Cite this

Davies, E., Joanne, S., Johansson, M., Hill, K., & Brown, K. (Accepted/In press). Can’t dance without being drunk? Exploring the enjoyment and acceptability of conscious clubbing in young people. In D. Conroy, & F. Measham (Eds.), Young Adult Drinking Styles: Current Perspectives on Research, Policy and Practice (1 ed.). Palgrave Macmilan.
Davies, Emma ; Joanne, Smith ; Johansson, Matthias ; Hill, Kimberley ; Brown, Kyle. / Can’t dance without being drunk? Exploring the enjoyment and acceptability of conscious clubbing in young people. Young Adult Drinking Styles: Current Perspectives on Research, Policy and Practice. editor / Dominic Conroy ; Fiona Measham. 1. ed. Palgrave Macmilan, 2019.
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Davies, E, Joanne, S, Johansson, M, Hill, K & Brown, K 2019, Can’t dance without being drunk? Exploring the enjoyment and acceptability of conscious clubbing in young people. in D Conroy & F Measham (eds), Young Adult Drinking Styles: Current Perspectives on Research, Policy and Practice. 1 edn, Palgrave Macmilan.

Can’t dance without being drunk? Exploring the enjoyment and acceptability of conscious clubbing in young people. / Davies, Emma; Joanne, Smith; Johansson, Matthias; Hill, Kimberley; Brown, Kyle.

Young Adult Drinking Styles: Current Perspectives on Research, Policy and Practice. ed. / Dominic Conroy; Fiona Measham. 1. ed. Palgrave Macmilan, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Can’t dance without being drunk? Exploring the enjoyment and acceptability of conscious clubbing in young people

AU - Davies, Emma

AU - Joanne, Smith

AU - Johansson, Matthias

AU - Hill, Kimberley

AU - Brown, Kyle

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Recently, there has been an emerging interest in alcohol-free music and dancing events within the UK, for example Morning Gloryville, which began in London in 2013 and claims to be the first to bring ‘conscious clubbing’ to the masses. In 2016, they received an award from Alcohol Concern at the ZERO Alcohol Awards for ‘Best Zero Alcohol Initiative’. Dance events like these provide a temporary escape, full of sensation and new experiences (e.g. Firat & Dholokia, 1998; Goulding, Shankar, & Elliott, 2002). Dancing has been found to be inherently rewarding and it associated with positive experiences, such as increased wellbeing (; Thomson & Jaque, 2012). Studies have also shown that taking part in physical group activities such as dancing may promote altruistic behaviors, social cohesion and wellbeing (Fischer, Callander, Reddish, & Bulbulia, 2013; Lakens & Stel, 2011:0 Bernardi NF, Bellemare-Pepin A and Peretz I (2017)). Electronic dance music (EDM) participants also express deeper reasons for engaging in these events, such as identity formation and change, a deeper sense of belonging in this world and also of transcendence and flow experiences (Goulding, Shankar, & Elliott, 2002; Jaimangal-Jones, Pritchard, & Morgan, 2009; Johner, 2015). Self-expression and identity formation are further expressed for these individuals as part of pre-event rituals and associated branding or clothing. Our project aimed to examine whether promotion of alcohol-free events may serve as a better harm reduction strategy than attempting to persuade students to reduce alcohol consumption. This chapter will integrate the emerging research evidence about experiences of alcohol free events together with research on the benefits of dancing. We will report findings from our own mixed methods study, as well as outline future avenues for research in this new field.

AB - Recently, there has been an emerging interest in alcohol-free music and dancing events within the UK, for example Morning Gloryville, which began in London in 2013 and claims to be the first to bring ‘conscious clubbing’ to the masses. In 2016, they received an award from Alcohol Concern at the ZERO Alcohol Awards for ‘Best Zero Alcohol Initiative’. Dance events like these provide a temporary escape, full of sensation and new experiences (e.g. Firat & Dholokia, 1998; Goulding, Shankar, & Elliott, 2002). Dancing has been found to be inherently rewarding and it associated with positive experiences, such as increased wellbeing (; Thomson & Jaque, 2012). Studies have also shown that taking part in physical group activities such as dancing may promote altruistic behaviors, social cohesion and wellbeing (Fischer, Callander, Reddish, & Bulbulia, 2013; Lakens & Stel, 2011:0 Bernardi NF, Bellemare-Pepin A and Peretz I (2017)). Electronic dance music (EDM) participants also express deeper reasons for engaging in these events, such as identity formation and change, a deeper sense of belonging in this world and also of transcendence and flow experiences (Goulding, Shankar, & Elliott, 2002; Jaimangal-Jones, Pritchard, & Morgan, 2009; Johner, 2015). Self-expression and identity formation are further expressed for these individuals as part of pre-event rituals and associated branding or clothing. Our project aimed to examine whether promotion of alcohol-free events may serve as a better harm reduction strategy than attempting to persuade students to reduce alcohol consumption. This chapter will integrate the emerging research evidence about experiences of alcohol free events together with research on the benefits of dancing. We will report findings from our own mixed methods study, as well as outline future avenues for research in this new field.

KW - Drinking

KW - Alcohol

KW - Wellbeing

KW - Health psychology

KW - Psychology

M3 - Chapter

SN - 978-3-030-28606-4

BT - Young Adult Drinking Styles: Current Perspectives on Research, Policy and Practice

A2 - Conroy, Dominic

A2 - Measham, Fiona

PB - Palgrave Macmilan

ER -

Davies E, Joanne S, Johansson M, Hill K, Brown K. Can’t dance without being drunk? Exploring the enjoyment and acceptability of conscious clubbing in young people. In Conroy D, Measham F, editors, Young Adult Drinking Styles: Current Perspectives on Research, Policy and Practice. 1 ed. Palgrave Macmilan. 2019