Constructing the scaffolding: the National Census and the English landed gentry family in the Victorian period

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    The family is the fundamental unit of society and was an important focus for identity, affection and sociability amongst landed elites. Historians of landed society have generally been reticent about studying the gentry family in any depth. This has been partly due to a general reliance on published biographical and genealogical sources as well as a focus on the estate rather than the family in archival material. A more fundamental understanding of gentry society will require greater levels and depths of knowledge relating to the structure and relationships of the family. In order to achieve this on a broad and representative scale new sources and methodologies will be required. This article provides an evaluation of the census enumerator's books as a source for studying landed society and suggests a number of avenues for future research
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalFamily & Community History
    Volume9
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2006

    Fingerprint

    Gentry
    Scaffolding
    Victorian Period
    Census
    Fundamental
    Methodology
    Reliance
    Estate
    Evaluation
    Elites
    Affection
    Sociability
    Historian

    Cite this

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    abstract = "The family is the fundamental unit of society and was an important focus for identity, affection and sociability amongst landed elites. Historians of landed society have generally been reticent about studying the gentry family in any depth. This has been partly due to a general reliance on published biographical and genealogical sources as well as a focus on the estate rather than the family in archival material. A more fundamental understanding of gentry society will require greater levels and depths of knowledge relating to the structure and relationships of the family. In order to achieve this on a broad and representative scale new sources and methodologies will be required. This article provides an evaluation of the census enumerator's books as a source for studying landed society and suggests a number of avenues for future research",
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    Constructing the scaffolding: the National Census and the English landed gentry family in the Victorian period. / Rothery, Mark.

    In: Family & Community History, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.11.2006.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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