CPD and revalidation: theory, practice and lessons from teachers

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

Abstract

As part of the revalidation process, midwives are required to undertake 35 hours of continuing professional development (CPD), of which 20 must be ‘participatory’ (Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), 2015a). ‘Participatory’ learning includes any learning activity which involves interaction with other people, providing the opportunity to learn with and from each other. Participation can take place face to face such as attendance at a study day or conference, or virtually, such as an online discussion group using a social media platform (NMC, 20178). A ‘participatory’ rather than ‘didactic’ approach to ongoing professional development is more likely to lead to positive changes in practice and thus better levels of care (NMC, 2014). This article will look at the theory of CPD and compare CPD activities of midwives and teachers to consider how ‘teacher research’ might be adopted by midwives with the potential for service improvement and as a consequence better quality of care.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Midwifery
Volume26
Issue number6
Early online date6 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Jun 2018

Fingerprint

theory-practice
midwife
nursing
teacher
social media
didactics
group discussion
learning
participation
interaction

Keywords

  • Continuing professional development
  • participatory learning
  • revalidation
  • teacher research

Cite this

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title = "CPD and revalidation: theory, practice and lessons from teachers",
abstract = "As part of the revalidation process, midwives are required to undertake 35 hours of continuing professional development (CPD), of which 20 must be ‘participatory’ (Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), 2015a). ‘Participatory’ learning includes any learning activity which involves interaction with other people, providing the opportunity to learn with and from each other. Participation can take place face to face such as attendance at a study day or conference, or virtually, such as an online discussion group using a social media platform (NMC, 20178). A ‘participatory’ rather than ‘didactic’ approach to ongoing professional development is more likely to lead to positive changes in practice and thus better levels of care (NMC, 2014). This article will look at the theory of CPD and compare CPD activities of midwives and teachers to consider how ‘teacher research’ might be adopted by midwives with the potential for service improvement and as a consequence better quality of care.",
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CPD and revalidation: theory, practice and lessons from teachers. / Power, Alison; Underwood, M James.

In: British Journal of Midwifery, Vol. 26, No. 6, 06.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

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