Dreaming of a National Socialist World: The World Union of National Socialists and the Tragic Vision of Transnational Neo-Nazism

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

    Abstract

    This article will survey the transnational dynamics of the World Union of National Socialists (WUNS), from its foundation in 1962 to the present day. It will examine a wide range of materials generated by the organisation, including its foundational document, the Cotswolds Declaration, as well as membership application details, WUNS bulletins, related magazines such as Stormtrooper, and its intellectual journals, National Socialist World and The National Socialist. By analysing material from affiliated organisations, it will also analyse how the network was able to foster contrasting relationships with sympathetic groups in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Europe, allowing other leading neo-Nazis, such as Colin Jordan, to develop a wider role internationally. It will argue that the neo-Nazi network reached its height in the mid to late 1960s, and also highlight how, in more recent times, the WUNS taken on a new role as an evocative ‘story’ in neo-Nazi history. This process of ‘accumulative extremism’, inventing a new tradition within the neo-Nazi movement, is important to recognise, as it helps us understand the self-mythologizing nature of neo-Nazi and wider neo-fascist cultures. Therefore, despite failing in its ambitions of creating a Nazi-inspired new global order, the lasting significance of the WUNS has been its ability to inspire newer transnational aspirations among neo-Nazis and neo-fascists.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-39
    Number of pages39
    JournalFascism
    Publication statusAccepted/In press - 8 Apr 2019

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    neo-Nazism
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    Dreaming
    National Socialists
    Neo-Nazism
    Canada
    present
    ability
    history

    Keywords

    • Neo-Nazism
    • Transnationalism
    • World Union of National Socialists
    • George Lincoln Rockwell
    • Colin Jordan
    • Fascism
    • WUNS

    Cite this

    @article{cc4cd3aa52794aa0b5192c04e94f0cdd,
    title = "Dreaming of a National Socialist World: The World Union of National Socialists and the Tragic Vision of Transnational Neo-Nazism",
    abstract = "This article will survey the transnational dynamics of the World Union of National Socialists (WUNS), from its foundation in 1962 to the present day. It will examine a wide range of materials generated by the organisation, including its foundational document, the Cotswolds Declaration, as well as membership application details, WUNS bulletins, related magazines such as Stormtrooper, and its intellectual journals, National Socialist World and The National Socialist. By analysing material from affiliated organisations, it will also analyse how the network was able to foster contrasting relationships with sympathetic groups in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Europe, allowing other leading neo-Nazis, such as Colin Jordan, to develop a wider role internationally. It will argue that the neo-Nazi network reached its height in the mid to late 1960s, and also highlight how, in more recent times, the WUNS taken on a new role as an evocative ‘story’ in neo-Nazi history. This process of ‘accumulative extremism’, inventing a new tradition within the neo-Nazi movement, is important to recognise, as it helps us understand the self-mythologizing nature of neo-Nazi and wider neo-fascist cultures. Therefore, despite failing in its ambitions of creating a Nazi-inspired new global order, the lasting significance of the WUNS has been its ability to inspire newer transnational aspirations among neo-Nazis and neo-fascists.",
    keywords = "Neo-Nazism, Transnationalism, World Union of National Socialists, George Lincoln Rockwell, Colin Jordan, Fascism, WUNS",
    author = "Paul Jackson",
    year = "2019",
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    AB - This article will survey the transnational dynamics of the World Union of National Socialists (WUNS), from its foundation in 1962 to the present day. It will examine a wide range of materials generated by the organisation, including its foundational document, the Cotswolds Declaration, as well as membership application details, WUNS bulletins, related magazines such as Stormtrooper, and its intellectual journals, National Socialist World and The National Socialist. By analysing material from affiliated organisations, it will also analyse how the network was able to foster contrasting relationships with sympathetic groups in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Europe, allowing other leading neo-Nazis, such as Colin Jordan, to develop a wider role internationally. It will argue that the neo-Nazi network reached its height in the mid to late 1960s, and also highlight how, in more recent times, the WUNS taken on a new role as an evocative ‘story’ in neo-Nazi history. This process of ‘accumulative extremism’, inventing a new tradition within the neo-Nazi movement, is important to recognise, as it helps us understand the self-mythologizing nature of neo-Nazi and wider neo-fascist cultures. Therefore, despite failing in its ambitions of creating a Nazi-inspired new global order, the lasting significance of the WUNS has been its ability to inspire newer transnational aspirations among neo-Nazis and neo-fascists.

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