Employers’ responses to the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa: revisiting the evidence

Kevin D Deane, Sara Stevano, Deborah Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Do employers have a role to play to support people living with HIV? The literature on sub-Saharan Africa points to the existence of a positive business case that sees firms as incentivised to provide HIV-related services to HIV positive workers . However, the evidence is narrow and incomplete, with the business case holding for a limited number of formal sector skilled workers, leaving out the majority of people living with HIV. If employers are to play a role, policy makers need to create conducive conditions for positive responses, in addition to – not in replacement of – strengthening public health care systems.
Original languageEnglish
JournalDevelopment Policy Review
Early online date2 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

Sub-Saharan Africa
Employers
Business case
Public health
Politicians
Workers
Skilled workers
Replacement
Health care system

Keywords

  • HIV
  • employment
  • workplace programmes
  • discrimination
  • private sector

Cite this

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Employers’ responses to the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa: revisiting the evidence. / Deane, Kevin D; Stevano, Sara; Johnston, Deborah.

In: Development Policy Review, 2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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