Enabling undergraduates to put into practice learning to support emotional well-being for children and young people

Wendy Turner

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In the UK policies such as the Children’s Plan 2008-2020 through to Promoting the Emotional Health of Children and Young People (2010) identify that professionals such as teachers, youth workers, social workers and youth offending specialists, do not have the necessary underpinning knowledge to adequately support children and young people’s emotional well-being. Further that these professionals fail to recognise when a child or young person may need additional help. These findings suggest that gaining knowledge and understanding of emotional well-being for children and young people is a key requirement for those working in this field. This paper is an evaluation of an initiative that saw a partnership of developing joint learning materials from expert emotional well-being organisations being delivered as part of an undergraduate award at a traditional Higher Educational (HE) Institution. The evaluation showed that the introduction of interactive, e-learning materials, supplemented with role play and scenario based learning and running concurrently alongside work experiences enabled students to acquire and apply knowledge and understanding of emotional well-being for children and young people to real situations, and thus bridged the ‘practice –theory gap'.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1
Pages (from-to)76-94
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Journal of Emotional Education
Volume6
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 3 Apr 2014

Keywords

  • Emotional well-being
  • education and knowledge
  • applied practice
  • practice-theory gap

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