Exploring the education background for children and young people sentenced to custody in England and Wales

Research output: Contribution to conference typesAbstractResearch

Abstract

Crime and offending by children and young people has received attention in political, academic and media rhetoric for decades. Concerns over the offending behaviour of children and young people in adolescence, resulted in the Government developing strategies (for example, Transforming Youth Custody – Putting education at the heart of detention) to reduce the offending and re-offending of children and young people. The Transforming Youth Custody report found 50 per cent of children and young people aged 15-17 years-old were entering custody with literacy levels the equivalent of children aged 7-11 years-old. From the children and young people entering custody, 18 per cent had statements of special educational needs and 36 per cent of young men ceased attending school at 14 years-old. Figures from the Transforming Youth Custody report, support research conducted by Bryan (2004) that children and young people aged between 18 and 21 years-old in YOI has a high proportion of language difficulties. Such concerns highlight the importance of exploring the educational background of children and young people entering custody and the importance of addressing educational issues before children and young people enter custody. By completed a retrospective case file analysis on a representative cohort of children and young people in custody, the researcher will explore the educational background of children and young people entering custody in the United Kingdom. Findings from this analysis are complemented by a questionnaire implemented to discover children and young people’s views of. By exploring the educational background of children and young people in the United Kingdom, this research will highlight the role of education in promoting desistance.

Conference

ConferenceEuropean Educational Research Association (ECER) 2017: Reforming Education and the Imperative of Constant Change: Ambivalent Roles of Policy and Educational Research
Period1/08/17 → …
Internet address

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child custody
education
special educational needs
adolescence
rhetoric
literacy
offense

Cite this

Paterson-Young, C., Hazenberg, R., & Bajwa-Patel, M. (2017). Exploring the education background for children and young people sentenced to custody in England and Wales. Abstract from European Educational Research Association (ECER) 2017: Reforming Education and the Imperative of Constant Change: Ambivalent Roles of Policy and Educational Research, .
Paterson-Young, Claire ; Hazenberg, Richard ; Bajwa-Patel, Meanu. / Exploring the education background for children and young people sentenced to custody in England and Wales. Abstract from European Educational Research Association (ECER) 2017: Reforming Education and the Imperative of Constant Change: Ambivalent Roles of Policy and Educational Research, .
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title = "Exploring the education background for children and young people sentenced to custody in England and Wales",
abstract = "Crime and offending by children and young people has received attention in political, academic and media rhetoric for decades. Concerns over the offending behaviour of children and young people in adolescence, resulted in the Government developing strategies (for example, Transforming Youth Custody – Putting education at the heart of detention) to reduce the offending and re-offending of children and young people. The Transforming Youth Custody report found 50 per cent of children and young people aged 15-17 years-old were entering custody with literacy levels the equivalent of children aged 7-11 years-old. From the children and young people entering custody, 18 per cent had statements of special educational needs and 36 per cent of young men ceased attending school at 14 years-old. Figures from the Transforming Youth Custody report, support research conducted by Bryan (2004) that children and young people aged between 18 and 21 years-old in YOI has a high proportion of language difficulties. Such concerns highlight the importance of exploring the educational background of children and young people entering custody and the importance of addressing educational issues before children and young people enter custody. By completed a retrospective case file analysis on a representative cohort of children and young people in custody, the researcher will explore the educational background of children and young people entering custody in the United Kingdom. Findings from this analysis are complemented by a questionnaire implemented to discover children and young people’s views of. By exploring the educational background of children and young people in the United Kingdom, this research will highlight the role of education in promoting desistance.",
author = "Claire Paterson-Young and Richard Hazenberg and Meanu Bajwa-Patel",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
language = "English",
note = "European Educational Research Association (ECER) 2017: Reforming Education and the Imperative of Constant Change: Ambivalent Roles of Policy and Educational Research ; Conference date: 01-08-2017",
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Paterson-Young, C, Hazenberg, R & Bajwa-Patel, M 2017, 'Exploring the education background for children and young people sentenced to custody in England and Wales' European Educational Research Association (ECER) 2017: Reforming Education and the Imperative of Constant Change: Ambivalent Roles of Policy and Educational Research, 1/08/17, .

Exploring the education background for children and young people sentenced to custody in England and Wales. / Paterson-Young, Claire; Hazenberg, Richard; Bajwa-Patel, Meanu.

2017. Abstract from European Educational Research Association (ECER) 2017: Reforming Education and the Imperative of Constant Change: Ambivalent Roles of Policy and Educational Research, .

Research output: Contribution to conference typesAbstractResearch

TY - CONF

T1 - Exploring the education background for children and young people sentenced to custody in England and Wales

AU - Paterson-Young, Claire

AU - Hazenberg, Richard

AU - Bajwa-Patel, Meanu

PY - 2017/8

Y1 - 2017/8

N2 - Crime and offending by children and young people has received attention in political, academic and media rhetoric for decades. Concerns over the offending behaviour of children and young people in adolescence, resulted in the Government developing strategies (for example, Transforming Youth Custody – Putting education at the heart of detention) to reduce the offending and re-offending of children and young people. The Transforming Youth Custody report found 50 per cent of children and young people aged 15-17 years-old were entering custody with literacy levels the equivalent of children aged 7-11 years-old. From the children and young people entering custody, 18 per cent had statements of special educational needs and 36 per cent of young men ceased attending school at 14 years-old. Figures from the Transforming Youth Custody report, support research conducted by Bryan (2004) that children and young people aged between 18 and 21 years-old in YOI has a high proportion of language difficulties. Such concerns highlight the importance of exploring the educational background of children and young people entering custody and the importance of addressing educational issues before children and young people enter custody. By completed a retrospective case file analysis on a representative cohort of children and young people in custody, the researcher will explore the educational background of children and young people entering custody in the United Kingdom. Findings from this analysis are complemented by a questionnaire implemented to discover children and young people’s views of. By exploring the educational background of children and young people in the United Kingdom, this research will highlight the role of education in promoting desistance.

AB - Crime and offending by children and young people has received attention in political, academic and media rhetoric for decades. Concerns over the offending behaviour of children and young people in adolescence, resulted in the Government developing strategies (for example, Transforming Youth Custody – Putting education at the heart of detention) to reduce the offending and re-offending of children and young people. The Transforming Youth Custody report found 50 per cent of children and young people aged 15-17 years-old were entering custody with literacy levels the equivalent of children aged 7-11 years-old. From the children and young people entering custody, 18 per cent had statements of special educational needs and 36 per cent of young men ceased attending school at 14 years-old. Figures from the Transforming Youth Custody report, support research conducted by Bryan (2004) that children and young people aged between 18 and 21 years-old in YOI has a high proportion of language difficulties. Such concerns highlight the importance of exploring the educational background of children and young people entering custody and the importance of addressing educational issues before children and young people enter custody. By completed a retrospective case file analysis on a representative cohort of children and young people in custody, the researcher will explore the educational background of children and young people entering custody in the United Kingdom. Findings from this analysis are complemented by a questionnaire implemented to discover children and young people’s views of. By exploring the educational background of children and young people in the United Kingdom, this research will highlight the role of education in promoting desistance.

UR - http://www.eera-ecer.de/ecer-2017-copenhagen/

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Paterson-Young C, Hazenberg R, Bajwa-Patel M. Exploring the education background for children and young people sentenced to custody in England and Wales. 2017. Abstract from European Educational Research Association (ECER) 2017: Reforming Education and the Imperative of Constant Change: Ambivalent Roles of Policy and Educational Research, .