Exploring the role of need for cognition, field independence and locus of control on the incidence of lucid dreams during a 12 week induction study

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Abstract

This article reports an investigation of two proposed theories, the predispositional and experiential, regarding the association of personality variables to lucid dreaming incidence during a 12-week lucid dreaming induction programme. The study found no differences between those who did and did not report lucid dreams during the programme on baseline measures of Field Independence, Locus of Control or Need for Cognition. There was an observed significant change towards a Field Independent orientation between baseline and post tests for those successful at inducing a lucid dream; with no statistically significant differences for either Locus of Control or Need for Cognition. Results suggest that Field Independence may not be a predispositional characteristic for the successful induction of lucid dreaming, but an experiential result of having lucid dream experiences. We conclude that experiences within a dream state may have appreciable effects on waking cognition.
Original languageEnglish
JournalDreaming
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2017

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Internal-External Control
Cognition
Incidence
Personality

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title = "Exploring the role of need for cognition, field independence and locus of control on the incidence of lucid dreams during a 12 week induction study",
abstract = "This article reports an investigation of two proposed theories, the predispositional and experiential, regarding the association of personality variables to lucid dreaming incidence during a 12-week lucid dreaming induction programme. The study found no differences between those who did and did not report lucid dreams during the programme on baseline measures of Field Independence, Locus of Control or Need for Cognition. There was an observed significant change towards a Field Independent orientation between baseline and post tests for those successful at inducing a lucid dream; with no statistically significant differences for either Locus of Control or Need for Cognition. Results suggest that Field Independence may not be a predispositional characteristic for the successful induction of lucid dreaming, but an experiential result of having lucid dream experiences. We conclude that experiences within a dream state may have appreciable effects on waking cognition.",
author = "David Saunders and Helen Clegg and Roe, {Chris A} and Smith, {G D}",
year = "2017",
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T1 - Exploring the role of need for cognition, field independence and locus of control on the incidence of lucid dreams during a 12 week induction study

AU - Saunders, David

AU - Clegg, Helen

AU - Roe, Chris A

AU - Smith, G D

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - This article reports an investigation of two proposed theories, the predispositional and experiential, regarding the association of personality variables to lucid dreaming incidence during a 12-week lucid dreaming induction programme. The study found no differences between those who did and did not report lucid dreams during the programme on baseline measures of Field Independence, Locus of Control or Need for Cognition. There was an observed significant change towards a Field Independent orientation between baseline and post tests for those successful at inducing a lucid dream; with no statistically significant differences for either Locus of Control or Need for Cognition. Results suggest that Field Independence may not be a predispositional characteristic for the successful induction of lucid dreaming, but an experiential result of having lucid dream experiences. We conclude that experiences within a dream state may have appreciable effects on waking cognition.

AB - This article reports an investigation of two proposed theories, the predispositional and experiential, regarding the association of personality variables to lucid dreaming incidence during a 12-week lucid dreaming induction programme. The study found no differences between those who did and did not report lucid dreams during the programme on baseline measures of Field Independence, Locus of Control or Need for Cognition. There was an observed significant change towards a Field Independent orientation between baseline and post tests for those successful at inducing a lucid dream; with no statistically significant differences for either Locus of Control or Need for Cognition. Results suggest that Field Independence may not be a predispositional characteristic for the successful induction of lucid dreaming, but an experiential result of having lucid dream experiences. We conclude that experiences within a dream state may have appreciable effects on waking cognition.

UR - http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/drm/

U2 - 10.1037/drm0000044

DO - 10.1037/drm0000044

M3 - Article

VL - 27

JO - Dreaming

JF - Dreaming

SN - 1053-0797

IS - 1

ER -