For the love of cuddly toys

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

Abstract

This essay reflects upon a particular moment at the end of Chris Philo’s Children’s Geographies lecture (see Philo 2016), when discussion turned to cuddly toys. I recall a particular mood constituted in and by this moment: of apparent bashfulness, hesitancy, things-left-unsaid, and disinclination to discuss cuddly toys within the space of an academic conference. I suggest that this incident might be understood as indicative of three sets of silences which, still, characterise a great deal of work within the fantastically vibrant subdisciplines of Children’s Geographies and Cultural Geographies. This argument is accompanied by photographic portraits of three particular toys: Angus, Arnold and the B.B.D. I hope that the presence of these portraits helps bring to the surface something of the often-silenced geographies – of memories, affects, intimacies and vulnerabilities, of play, fun and care, and of material and popular cultures – upon which my argument is focused.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)446-454
Number of pages9
JournalChildren's Geographies
Volume16
Issue number4
Early online date31 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jul 2018

Fingerprint

Geography
Toys
Indicative
Material Culture
Intimacy
Fun
Cultural Geography
Mood
Vulnerability
Popular Culture

Keywords

  • Children’s geographies
  • Philo
  • cuddly toys
  • memories
  • play
  • popular culture

Cite this

Horton, John. / For the love of cuddly toys. In: Children's Geographies. 2018 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 446-454.
@article{a6463621eea641d7a579f86714eff3bd,
title = "For the love of cuddly toys",
abstract = "This essay reflects upon a particular moment at the end of Chris Philo’s Children’s Geographies lecture (see Philo 2016), when discussion turned to cuddly toys. I recall a particular mood constituted in and by this moment: of apparent bashfulness, hesitancy, things-left-unsaid, and disinclination to discuss cuddly toys within the space of an academic conference. I suggest that this incident might be understood as indicative of three sets of silences which, still, characterise a great deal of work within the fantastically vibrant subdisciplines of Children’s Geographies and Cultural Geographies. This argument is accompanied by photographic portraits of three particular toys: Angus, Arnold and the B.B.D. I hope that the presence of these portraits helps bring to the surface something of the often-silenced geographies – of memories, affects, intimacies and vulnerabilities, of play, fun and care, and of material and popular cultures – upon which my argument is focused.",
keywords = "Children’s geographies, Philo, cuddly toys, memories, play, popular culture",
author = "John Horton",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1080/14733285.2018.1457735",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "446--454",
journal = "Children’s Geographies",
issn = "1473-3285",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "4",

}

For the love of cuddly toys. / Horton, John.

In: Children's Geographies, Vol. 16, No. 4, 04.07.2018, p. 446-454.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - For the love of cuddly toys

AU - Horton, John

PY - 2018/7/4

Y1 - 2018/7/4

N2 - This essay reflects upon a particular moment at the end of Chris Philo’s Children’s Geographies lecture (see Philo 2016), when discussion turned to cuddly toys. I recall a particular mood constituted in and by this moment: of apparent bashfulness, hesitancy, things-left-unsaid, and disinclination to discuss cuddly toys within the space of an academic conference. I suggest that this incident might be understood as indicative of three sets of silences which, still, characterise a great deal of work within the fantastically vibrant subdisciplines of Children’s Geographies and Cultural Geographies. This argument is accompanied by photographic portraits of three particular toys: Angus, Arnold and the B.B.D. I hope that the presence of these portraits helps bring to the surface something of the often-silenced geographies – of memories, affects, intimacies and vulnerabilities, of play, fun and care, and of material and popular cultures – upon which my argument is focused.

AB - This essay reflects upon a particular moment at the end of Chris Philo’s Children’s Geographies lecture (see Philo 2016), when discussion turned to cuddly toys. I recall a particular mood constituted in and by this moment: of apparent bashfulness, hesitancy, things-left-unsaid, and disinclination to discuss cuddly toys within the space of an academic conference. I suggest that this incident might be understood as indicative of three sets of silences which, still, characterise a great deal of work within the fantastically vibrant subdisciplines of Children’s Geographies and Cultural Geographies. This argument is accompanied by photographic portraits of three particular toys: Angus, Arnold and the B.B.D. I hope that the presence of these portraits helps bring to the surface something of the often-silenced geographies – of memories, affects, intimacies and vulnerabilities, of play, fun and care, and of material and popular cultures – upon which my argument is focused.

KW - Children’s geographies

KW - Philo

KW - cuddly toys

KW - memories

KW - play

KW - popular culture

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/love-cuddly-toys

U2 - 10.1080/14733285.2018.1457735

DO - 10.1080/14733285.2018.1457735

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 446

EP - 454

JO - Children’s Geographies

JF - Children’s Geographies

SN - 1473-3285

IS - 4

ER -