From colonial outsider to postcolonial insider: some screen adaptations from Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa

Janet M Wilson, Om Prakash Dwivedi (Editor), Martin Kich (Editor)

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapter

Abstract

This paper examines the ways that screen adaptations of novels in the cinema of Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa have contributed to new versions of national identity by redeploying and redefining images of the colonial past that were previously represented in oral and literary formats. By reinforcing and critiquing the dominant narrative motifs of the Lost Child in Australia and the Man Alone in New Zealand, often by reinterpreting them from more recent and global perspectives, screen adaptations of novels help reconstruct the national imaginary in relation to the postcolonial and global contemporary. Films examined include Peter Weir’s Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975), Roger Donaldson’s Sleeping Dogs (1977), and Brad McGann’s In My Father’s Den (2004). Each, in different ways, rearticulates cultural constructions of male protagonists to show new dimensions of heroism in the national imaginary.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPostcolonial Theory in the Global Age: Interdisciplinary Essays
Place of PublicationJefferson, North Carolina
PublisherMacFarland & Company, Inc
Pages59-72
Number of pages206
ISBN (Print)9780786475520
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Novel
Colonies
New Zealand
Outsider
Dog
Heroism
Motifs
Rock
Cinema
Picnic
Protagonist
National Identity

Keywords

  • screen adaptations
  • Australia
  • New Zealand/Aotearoa
  • colonial outsider
  • postcolonial insider
  • man alone
  • the lost child

Cite this

Wilson, J. M., Dwivedi, O. P. (Ed.), & Kich, M. (Ed.) (2013). From colonial outsider to postcolonial insider: some screen adaptations from Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa. In Postcolonial Theory in the Global Age: Interdisciplinary Essays (pp. 59-72). Jefferson, North Carolina: MacFarland & Company, Inc.
Wilson, Janet M ; Dwivedi, Om Prakash (Editor) ; Kich, Martin (Editor). / From colonial outsider to postcolonial insider: some screen adaptations from Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa. Postcolonial Theory in the Global Age: Interdisciplinary Essays. Jefferson, North Carolina : MacFarland & Company, Inc, 2013. pp. 59-72
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Wilson, JM, Dwivedi, OP (ed.) & Kich, M (ed.) 2013, From colonial outsider to postcolonial insider: some screen adaptations from Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa. in Postcolonial Theory in the Global Age: Interdisciplinary Essays. MacFarland & Company, Inc, Jefferson, North Carolina, pp. 59-72.

From colonial outsider to postcolonial insider: some screen adaptations from Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa. / Wilson, Janet M; Dwivedi, Om Prakash (Editor); Kich, Martin (Editor).

Postcolonial Theory in the Global Age: Interdisciplinary Essays. Jefferson, North Carolina : MacFarland & Company, Inc, 2013. p. 59-72.

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapter

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Wilson JM, Dwivedi OP, (ed.), Kich M, (ed.). From colonial outsider to postcolonial insider: some screen adaptations from Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa. In Postcolonial Theory in the Global Age: Interdisciplinary Essays. Jefferson, North Carolina: MacFarland & Company, Inc. 2013. p. 59-72