Geographies of supply: Stoneleigh Abbey and Arbury Hall in the eighteenth century

Mark Rothery, Jon Stobart, Jon Stobart (Editor), Andrew Hann (Editor)

Research output: Contribution to Book/ReportChapter

Abstract

This sumptuously illustrated volume brings together 19 curators, historians, conservators, and other heritage professionals to look anew at the country house in Europe from the standpoint of ‘some of the conceptual and historiographical writing on consumption’ and material culture. The publication grew out of a 2012 conference at the University of Northampton (co‐organized by the Economic History Society) whose stated purpose was to consider ‘the country house … [as] a site, product and process of consumption’ (p. 1). Such an inclusive brief ensured that organizing the contributions into consistent themes would be no easy task. The result is, rather like some country houses, not always structurally coherent but full of delights.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Country House: Material Culture and Consumption
Place of PublicationSwindon
PublisherHistoric England
Pages43-54
Number of pages214
ISBN (Print)9781848022331
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016
EventConsuming the Country House - The University of Northampton
Duration: 1 Apr 2012 → …

Conference

ConferenceConsuming the Country House
Period1/04/12 → …

Fingerprint

Geography
Country House
Abbeys
Historian
Economic History Society
Organizing
Material Culture
Northampton
Heritage
Conservators

Keywords

  • Country house
  • supply network
  • retailers
  • London

Cite this

Rothery, M., Stobart, J., Stobart, J. (Ed.), & Hann, A. (Ed.) (2016). Geographies of supply: Stoneleigh Abbey and Arbury Hall in the eighteenth century. In The Country House: Material Culture and Consumption (pp. 43-54). Swindon: Historic England. https://doi.org/10.1111/ehr.12440
Rothery, Mark ; Stobart, Jon ; Stobart, Jon (Editor) ; Hann, Andrew (Editor). / Geographies of supply: Stoneleigh Abbey and Arbury Hall in the eighteenth century. The Country House: Material Culture and Consumption. Swindon : Historic England, 2016. pp. 43-54
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Rothery, M, Stobart, J, Stobart, J (ed.) & Hann, A (ed.) 2016, Geographies of supply: Stoneleigh Abbey and Arbury Hall in the eighteenth century. in The Country House: Material Culture and Consumption. Historic England, Swindon, pp. 43-54, Consuming the Country House, 1/04/12. https://doi.org/10.1111/ehr.12440

Geographies of supply: Stoneleigh Abbey and Arbury Hall in the eighteenth century. / Rothery, Mark; Stobart, Jon; Stobart, Jon (Editor); Hann, Andrew (Editor).

The Country House: Material Culture and Consumption. Swindon : Historic England, 2016. p. 43-54.

Research output: Contribution to Book/ReportChapter

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Rothery M, Stobart J, Stobart J, (ed.), Hann A, (ed.). Geographies of supply: Stoneleigh Abbey and Arbury Hall in the eighteenth century. In The Country House: Material Culture and Consumption. Swindon: Historic England. 2016. p. 43-54 https://doi.org/10.1111/ehr.12440