Impact of training on change in practice for education assistants in a group of international private schools in Hong Kong

Richard Rose, Chris Forlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper reports research that evaluated the efficacy of training for education assistants and its impact upon changing practices in a group of private international schools in Hong Kong, China. Two cohorts of education assistants received training through an educational institute. The focus was on supporting and fostering inclusive practices in schools. The expectations and perceptions of the education assistants regarding the training was recorded through survey and focus group interviews and discussed alongside international literature in the area of classroom support and inclusive schooling. The paper concludes that the provision of training was successful in meeting education assistants' expectations and in increasing personal confidence and raising self-esteem, but that they face many challenges if their learning is to be applied. The research further reveals that education assistants within Hong Kong schools lack clarity in their role and a narrow understanding of how they may be most appropriately utilised within schools has led to a limiting of their deployment. Implications for training providers and the teaching profession are discussed
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-323
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Inclusive Education
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2010

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self-esteem
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profession
classroom
China
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Teaching
interview
learning

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Impact of training on change in practice for education assistants in a group of international private schools in Hong Kong. / Rose, Richard; Forlin, Chris.

In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.05.2010, p. 309-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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