Inclusive daily childcare services for children with disabilities in England: review of conditions, standards and practice

Research output: Book/Report typesCommissioned reportResearch

Abstract

Considerations about the importance of early childhood education and care (ECEC) have grown considerably in the last three decades in England, in Europe and at the wider international level. Located within the fast pace of European enlargement, new social, political and economic factors created the conditions for an increased focus on the benefits of affordable and effective childcare. This working paper outlines the UK (England) context in relation to policy, standards and practice of childcare for all children, and, in particular, it examines the extent to which childcare provision is inclusive for children with disabilities. Based on the data and research, this paper argues that while much has been achieved,
there are still many challenges to be overcome. While inclusion, as the right of all children to have access to education and care and participate in it are enshrined in legislation, recent policy development in education and welfare and the variety and variability of childcare offer and provision do not seem to be conducive to establishing clear guidelines or reliable generalisations. This latter problem is further compounded by a lack of systematic and rigorous research, and a lack of reliable statistical data. This paper, therefore, suggests that more research should be carried out to gain a better understanding of the extent to which childcare in England supports the inclusion of children with disabilities and special educational needs.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages144
Publication statusPublished - 16 Jan 2013

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disability
inclusion
early childhood education and care
special educational needs
lack
political factors
economic factors
social factors
development policy
education
welfare
legislation

Keywords

  • day care
  • disability
  • early years
  • inclusion
  • special educational needs

Cite this

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title = "Inclusive daily childcare services for children with disabilities in England: review of conditions, standards and practice",
abstract = "Considerations about the importance of early childhood education and care (ECEC) have grown considerably in the last three decades in England, in Europe and at the wider international level. Located within the fast pace of European enlargement, new social, political and economic factors created the conditions for an increased focus on the benefits of affordable and effective childcare. This working paper outlines the UK (England) context in relation to policy, standards and practice of childcare for all children, and, in particular, it examines the extent to which childcare provision is inclusive for children with disabilities. Based on the data and research, this paper argues that while much has been achieved,there are still many challenges to be overcome. While inclusion, as the right of all children to have access to education and care and participate in it are enshrined in legislation, recent policy development in education and welfare and the variety and variability of childcare offer and provision do not seem to be conducive to establishing clear guidelines or reliable generalisations. This latter problem is further compounded by a lack of systematic and rigorous research, and a lack of reliable statistical data. This paper, therefore, suggests that more research should be carried out to gain a better understanding of the extent to which childcare in England supports the inclusion of children with disabilities and special educational needs.",
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