Inheritance events and spending patterns in the English country house: the Leigh family of Stoneleigh Abbey, 1738-1806

Mark Rothery, Jon Stobart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article analyses the everyday spending patterns of the Leigh family of Stoneleigh Abbey, Warwickshire, in relation to inheritance, demography and trusteeship. The analysis makes use of a large dataset of receipted bills along with various other types of accounts and legal documents. We show that several factors contributed to the survival and flourishing of the Leigh estates. These included, first, moderate levels of spending by successive owners of the family estates, punctuated by periodic surges in spending following inheritance events, second, demographic factors, and, third, the responsible management of the estate by trustees during periods of minority. This analysis illustrates that careful economic management, rather than conspicuous consumption, was the defining feature of wealthy landed families such as the Leighs
Original languageEnglish
Article number3
Pages (from-to)379-407
Number of pages29
JournalContinuity and Change
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2012

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abstract = "This article analyses the everyday spending patterns of the Leigh family of Stoneleigh Abbey, Warwickshire, in relation to inheritance, demography and trusteeship. The analysis makes use of a large dataset of receipted bills along with various other types of accounts and legal documents. We show that several factors contributed to the survival and flourishing of the Leigh estates. These included, first, moderate levels of spending by successive owners of the family estates, punctuated by periodic surges in spending following inheritance events, second, demographic factors, and, third, the responsible management of the estate by trustees during periods of minority. This analysis illustrates that careful economic management, rather than conspicuous consumption, was the defining feature of wealthy landed families such as the Leighs",
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Inheritance events and spending patterns in the English country house: the Leigh family of Stoneleigh Abbey, 1738-1806. / Rothery, Mark; Stobart, Jon.

In: Continuity and Change, Vol. 27, No. 3, 3, 01.11.2012, p. 379-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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