It's a man's world; mate guarding and the evolution of patriarchy

Rachel Grant, Tamara Montrose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During human evolution the prevention of cuckoldry has been
an adaptive problem for the human male, solved in many other
species by intensely guarding females during fertile periods. Signs
of estrus in human females are much subtler than in many other
species meaning that there is less certainty of the exact timing of the
fertile period. This necessitates extended mate guarding which
potentially reduces male fitness due to the loss of extra-pair
fertilization opportunities and other fitness-compromising costs,
such as reduction in the time spent acquiring status and resources.
Patriarchy is a system of implicit and explicit rules of conduct, of
power structures, and of belief systems that support male control
over women’s reproduction and has existed for thousands of years.
We examine the manifestations of patriarchy as a unique form of
mate guarding which is able to function even in the absence of
males. We explore historical and contemporary patriarchal practices
such as rape, foot-binding, honor-killing and female genital
mutilation and argue that males use patriarchy to increase the costs
associated with female extra-pair copulation to increase their
certainty of paternity. At the same time patriarchy functions to
enforce in-pair childbearing by discouraging contraception and

abortion. We propose that this form of control of females evolved to avoid an evolutionary trade-off between the benefits of monogamy and those of promiscuity for human males and that there has been selection on females for those compliant with patriarchy, who tended to have more surviving offspring. We also discuss patriarchy in the context of niche construction and propose that patriarchy is a cultural niche which has functioned to maximize individual males’ fitness. When viewed from an evolutionary perspective, the persistence of patriarchy into the 21
st century is unsurprising.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)384-418
JournalMankind Quarterly
Volume58
Issue number3
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1 Mar 2018

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honor
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Cite this

Grant, Rachel ; Montrose, Tamara . / It's a man's world; mate guarding and the evolution of patriarchy. In: Mankind Quarterly. 2018 ; Vol. 58, No. 3. pp. 384-418.
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It's a man's world; mate guarding and the evolution of patriarchy. / Grant, Rachel; Montrose, Tamara .

In: Mankind Quarterly, Vol. 58, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 384-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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