Managing women in pregnancy after bariatric surgery: The midwife as the co-ordinator of care

Alison Power, Jenny Abraham, Shah Neha

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

Abstract

Bariatric surgery is a recommended, cost-effective, evidenced-based intervention to reduce weight and associated comorbidities in severely obese people. People with a BMI of 40 kg/m2 or more, or a BMI between 35–40 kg/m2 with other medical conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol and obstructive sleep apnoea meet the criteria to be considered for bariatric surgery. Over the past 10 years, bariatric surgery in the UK has been more widely accessible and consequently midwives may be required to care for pregnant women who have undergone bariatric surgery such as a gastric band, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass.

Midwives are required to work co-operatively, recognising and working within the limits of their competence and providing leadership. The aim of this article is to consider the midwife's role as co-ordinator of care for pregnant women who have undergone bariatric surgery. It outlines the most common bariatric procedures and specific considerations, including nutritional supplementation required when providing care to women in the antenatal and postnatal period.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)549-554
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Midwifery
Volume27
Issue number9
Early online date6 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Sep 2019

Fingerprint

Bariatric Surgery
Midwifery
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Bariatrics
Gastric Bypass
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Gastrectomy
Mental Competency
Comorbidity
Stomach
Cholesterol
Hypertension
Weights and Measures
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Bariatric surgery
  • Antenatal care
  • Contraception
  • Postnatal care
  • Multidisciplinary team

Cite this

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Managing women in pregnancy after bariatric surgery: The midwife as the co-ordinator of care. / Power, Alison; Abraham, Jenny; Neha, Shah.

In: British Journal of Midwifery, Vol. 27, No. 9, 06.09.2019, p. 549-554.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

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AU - Abraham, Jenny

AU - Neha, Shah

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