Narratives of Leaving and Returning to Homeland: The Example of Greek Brain Drainers Living in the UK

Athanasia Chalari, Efi Koutantou

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Narratives of why people migrate can be primarily associated with the study of migration in terms of people’s drivers of leaving and returning to homeland. Greek people have been very familiar with the idea of leaving as well as returning home, throughout modern Greek history; yet, due to the ongoing Greek crisis and prolonged austerity, a new migration wave has been formed associated with young professionals and scientists (brain drainers). This study utilises the qualitative collection and analysis of 31 narrative interviews contacted with Greek brain drainers currently living in the UK, in an attempt to examine, understand, and explain the drivers of leaving and returning to homeland. We argue that factors leading to the decision of leaving as well as the consideration (or hesitation) of returning are associated with (a) macro-factors relating to the socio-economic situation of the origin country (associated with the eliminating economic and personal development) as well as (b) powerful drivers of enduring cultural and social mentalities, associated with a mosaic of distinctive norms formed and established beyond the Greek crisis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalSociological Research Online
Volume0
Early online date29 Oct 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Greek crisis
  • brain drain
  • factors and drivers of migration
  • leaving and returning to homeland
  • narratives

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