Parasites, energy and complex systems: generating novel intervention options to counter recruitment to suicide terrorism

Mils Hills, Ashwin Mehta, Alex Stedmon (Editor), Glyn Lawson (Editor)

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Having been developed through presentation at a range of defence research fora in the United Kingdom, in 2012 Hills published a thought-piece titled A New Perspective on the Achievement of Psychological Effects from Cyber Warfare Payloads: The Analogy of Parasitic Manipulation of Host Behavior (Hills 2012). Informed by personal experience working within the UK counter-terrorism and wider defence and security community – and constantly irritated by superficial media coverage that describes terrorists and other criminals as “brainwashed” - Hills sought to both challenge conventional explanations by means of Analogical Research (AR) as well as to encourage scholarly collaboration. This paper has arisen from interaction stimulated by the 2012 publication and the authors introduce further elaboration around the analogy of parasitic infection shaping or driving undesirable behaviour. It is intended to once again catalyse reactions as well as suggest the potential for practical interventions in policy.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHostile Intent and Counter-Terrorism: Human Factors Theory and Application
Place of PublicationFarnham
PublisherAshgate
Pages225-231
Number of pages356
ISBN (Print)9781472402103
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

Publication series

NameHuman factors in defence

Fingerprint

suicide
terrorism
energy
traffic behavior
warfare
manipulation
coverage
interaction
community
experience

Keywords

  • Counter-terrorism
  • suicide terrorism
  • recruitment of terrorists
  • unconventional approaches
  • psychological effects
  • parasites
  • analogical reasoning
  • innovative options
  • deviant behaviour
  • behaviour shaping

Cite this

Hills, M., Mehta, A., Stedmon, A. (Ed.), & Lawson, G. (Ed.) (2015). Parasites, energy and complex systems: generating novel intervention options to counter recruitment to suicide terrorism. In Hostile Intent and Counter-Terrorism: Human Factors Theory and Application (pp. 225-231). (Human factors in defence). Farnham: Ashgate.
Hills, Mils ; Mehta, Ashwin ; Stedmon, Alex (Editor) ; Lawson, Glyn (Editor). / Parasites, energy and complex systems: generating novel intervention options to counter recruitment to suicide terrorism. Hostile Intent and Counter-Terrorism: Human Factors Theory and Application. Farnham : Ashgate, 2015. pp. 225-231 (Human factors in defence).
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Hills, M, Mehta, A, Stedmon, A (ed.) & Lawson, G (ed.) 2015, Parasites, energy and complex systems: generating novel intervention options to counter recruitment to suicide terrorism. in Hostile Intent and Counter-Terrorism: Human Factors Theory and Application. Human factors in defence, Ashgate, Farnham, pp. 225-231.

Parasites, energy and complex systems: generating novel intervention options to counter recruitment to suicide terrorism. / Hills, Mils; Mehta, Ashwin; Stedmon, Alex (Editor); Lawson, Glyn (Editor).

Hostile Intent and Counter-Terrorism: Human Factors Theory and Application. Farnham : Ashgate, 2015. p. 225-231 (Human factors in defence).

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

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KW - suicide terrorism

KW - recruitment of terrorists

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KW - innovative options

KW - deviant behaviour

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Hills M, Mehta A, Stedmon A, (ed.), Lawson G, (ed.). Parasites, energy and complex systems: generating novel intervention options to counter recruitment to suicide terrorism. In Hostile Intent and Counter-Terrorism: Human Factors Theory and Application. Farnham: Ashgate. 2015. p. 225-231. (Human factors in defence).