Parents’ Attitudes to Inclusive Education: A Study Conducted in Early Years Settings in Inclusive Mainstream Schools in Bangkok, Thailand

Helen Trory, Juhi Sharma

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the under researched area of parents’ attitudes towards inclusion in inclusive mainstream early years settings in Thailand. The sample consisted of 71 parents: those with typically developing children (TDC) (50 parents) and children with special educational needs (SEN) (21 parents), residing in Bangkok, Thailand. Data was collected through the use of a mixed methods approach. The results of this study indicate that overall parental attitudes toward inclusion are positive. Parents of TDC identified social development of their children as the key benefit of inclusion but seemed to be concerned about the need for teacher training. Parents of children with SEN identified social acceptance and improved academic skills as advantages of inclusion for their children. Their concerns also focused on mainstream teachers having appropriate training to successfully integrate students with disabilities, and the deployment of special education staff in the regular classroom.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)877-893
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Special Education
Volume33
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 23 Sep 2019

Keywords

  • special educational needs
  • inclusive education
  • parent attitudes
  • early years
  • Thailand
  • mixed methods research
  • disability

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