Primary teachers’ perceptions of whole-class teaching and learning in English primary schools: an exploratory study of perceived benefits, challenges and effective practice

Zoe Slater, Gill Chambers

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This research contributes to ongoing debate surrounding primary teachers’ perceptions of key benefits, challenges and effective practice associated with whole-class teaching and learning in the primary school. A review of pre-existing literature relevant to the practice and perceptions of whole-class teaching and learning informed the scope and design of the study. A mixed methods exploratory approach was employed through the distribution of digital questionnaires and one-to-one semi-structured interviews, involving thirty-eight primary teachers employed across ten schools in the East Midlands and South East England. Statistical analysis and thematic, inductive and theoretical coding of the resulting data highlighted perceived social benefits alongside challenges surrounding whole-class adaptive teaching. The findings concluded that whole-class pedagogy may be most effective when diverse approaches to questioning and verbal discourse are collectively embedded within a shared directive for practice, and when the engagement of all pupils is continually promoted and sustained throughout teaching and learning.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEducation 3-13
Early online date23 Sep 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 Sep 2022

Keywords

  • whole-class
  • classroom practice
  • teaching and learning
  • Primary eduation
  • teacher perceptions
  • benefits and challenges
  • effective practice

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Primary teachers’ perceptions of whole-class teaching and learning in English primary schools: an exploratory study of perceived benefits, challenges and effective practice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this