Realising resource efficiency in the management of healthcare waste from the Cornwall National Health Service (NHS) in the UK

Terry Louis Tudor, Claire L. Marsh, Sharon Butler, J. A. Van Horn, L. E.T. Jenkin

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The quantities of waste generated by the healthcare sector in the United Kingdom (UK) have been shown to be amongst the highest in Europe. Based on a case study undertaken within the Cornwall NHS (National Health Service) in the UK, this paper reports on the results of waste minimisation trials. The schemes were able to achieve significant waste reductions in both clinical and domestic waste quantities. Indeed, a reduction in domestic bag waste in the range of 1.6–33.4%, with an average of 14.8% was realised. For clinical waste, the reduction ranged from 1.8% to 38.3%, at an average of 15.7%, with net cost benefits of nearly US$ 25,000 over the period of 1–3 years. The outcomes suggest that significant resource and financial efficiencies can be attained, but due to the many factors involved, there is a need to focus both on containment and logistics, as well as social factors for success.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1209-1218
    Number of pages10
    JournalWaste Management
    Volume28
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

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