Refugees and evacuees: enhancing historical understanding through Irish historical fiction with Key Stage 2 and early Key Stage 3 pupils

Paul Bracey, A Gove-Humphries, Darius Jackson

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

Abstract

This article explores the use of historical fiction as a means of undertaking a historical enquiry into the experiences of refugees and evacuees with Key Stage 2 and 3 pupils. The authors reflect on the reasons why people have come to Britain before focussing on specific circumstances associated with World War 2. This is undertaken through the use of two historical fiction novels set in Ireland. The choice of an Irish context is intended to challenge Anglo centric notions of the past. The authors also examine differing opinions over the validity of the place of historical fiction in history lessons and make a strong case for its inclusion. Specific teaching and learning approaches, together with teacher and pupil responses are considered. The novels chosen focus on an Irish dimension which also reflects the authors' work with the Ireland in Schools Project
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-112
Number of pages9
JournalEducation 3-13
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2006

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Refugees and evacuees: enhancing historical understanding through Irish historical fiction with Key Stage 2 and early Key Stage 3 pupils. / Bracey, Paul; Gove-Humphries, A; Jackson, Darius.

In: Education 3-13, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.06.2006, p. 103-112.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

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