Restorative supervision for student midwives: the professional midwifery advocate in the classroom

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

Abstract

Women and their families are entitled to high quality, safe and effective maternity care, yet reports have identified failings in areas of care such as risk assessment and care planning. As a result, there have been fundamental changes in the way midwives are regulated in the UK. With these changes came the development of a new model for midwifery clinical supervision, aligned to the aims of the Department of Health and Social Care and NHS England to provide a high quality service, delivered by resilient, highly valued, well-supported midwives. This article will consider the role of a Professional Midwifery Advocate in a university setting to explore how the early introduction of the role and implementation of group-based restorative supervision may positively impact on student midwives' training, reduce attrition rates, encourage the development of resilience and foster an ethos of peer support.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Midwifery
Volume26
Issue number5
Early online date2 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 May 2018

Fingerprint

Midwifery
Students
Professional Role
England
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • PMA
  • restorative clinical supervision
  • pre-registration midwifery education
  • A-EQUIP
  • resilience

Cite this

@article{dd86981371fe4596aa3f3e97dc7abfc3,
title = "Restorative supervision for student midwives: the professional midwifery advocate in the classroom",
abstract = "Women and their families are entitled to high quality, safe and effective maternity care, yet reports have identified failings in areas of care such as risk assessment and care planning. As a result, there have been fundamental changes in the way midwives are regulated in the UK. With these changes came the development of a new model for midwifery clinical supervision, aligned to the aims of the Department of Health and Social Care and NHS England to provide a high quality service, delivered by resilient, highly valued, well-supported midwives. This article will consider the role of a Professional Midwifery Advocate in a university setting to explore how the early introduction of the role and implementation of group-based restorative supervision may positively impact on student midwives' training, reduce attrition rates, encourage the development of resilience and foster an ethos of peer support.",
keywords = "PMA, restorative clinical supervision, pre-registration midwifery education, A-EQUIP, resilience",
author = "Alison Power and Cheryl Thomas",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "2",
doi = "10.12968/bjom.2018.26.5.344",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
journal = "British Journal of Midwifery",
issn = "0969-4900",
publisher = "Mark Allen Healthcare",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Restorative supervision for student midwives: the professional midwifery advocate in the classroom

AU - Power, Alison

AU - Thomas, Cheryl

PY - 2018/5/2

Y1 - 2018/5/2

N2 - Women and their families are entitled to high quality, safe and effective maternity care, yet reports have identified failings in areas of care such as risk assessment and care planning. As a result, there have been fundamental changes in the way midwives are regulated in the UK. With these changes came the development of a new model for midwifery clinical supervision, aligned to the aims of the Department of Health and Social Care and NHS England to provide a high quality service, delivered by resilient, highly valued, well-supported midwives. This article will consider the role of a Professional Midwifery Advocate in a university setting to explore how the early introduction of the role and implementation of group-based restorative supervision may positively impact on student midwives' training, reduce attrition rates, encourage the development of resilience and foster an ethos of peer support.

AB - Women and their families are entitled to high quality, safe and effective maternity care, yet reports have identified failings in areas of care such as risk assessment and care planning. As a result, there have been fundamental changes in the way midwives are regulated in the UK. With these changes came the development of a new model for midwifery clinical supervision, aligned to the aims of the Department of Health and Social Care and NHS England to provide a high quality service, delivered by resilient, highly valued, well-supported midwives. This article will consider the role of a Professional Midwifery Advocate in a university setting to explore how the early introduction of the role and implementation of group-based restorative supervision may positively impact on student midwives' training, reduce attrition rates, encourage the development of resilience and foster an ethos of peer support.

KW - PMA

KW - restorative clinical supervision

KW - pre-registration midwifery education

KW - A-EQUIP

KW - resilience

U2 - 10.12968/bjom.2018.26.5.344

DO - 10.12968/bjom.2018.26.5.344

M3 - Article

VL - 26

JO - British Journal of Midwifery

JF - British Journal of Midwifery

SN - 0969-4900

IS - 5

ER -