Sharenting: Pride, affect and the day to day politics of digital mothering

Lisa Lazard, Rose Capdevila, Charlotte Jade Dann, Abigail Locke, Sandra Roper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The coming together of parenting and routine posting on social networking sites has become a visible and recognisable theme and the term ‘sharenting’ has found a place in everyday talk to describe some forms of parental digital sharing practices. However, while social media has undoubtedly provided a space for parents to share experiences and receive support around parenting, sharenting remains a contestable issue. Thus, one reading of sharenting would be as a display of good parenting as mothers ‘show off’ their children as a marker of success. However, the term also can be used pejoratively to describe parental oversharing of child-focused images and content. In this paper we explore the practice of sharenting in terms of pride, affect, and the politics of digital mothering in a neoliberal context to conclude that sharenting can be best understood as a complex affective and intersectional accomplishment that produces motherhood and family as communicative activities within digital social practices.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalSocial and Personality Psychology Compass
Early online date6 Mar 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Mar 2019

Fingerprint

politics
motherhood
social media
networking
parents
experience

Keywords

  • Sharenting
  • Humblebragging
  • Pride
  • Affect
  • Digital mothering
  • Gender
  • Parenting online

Cite this

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abstract = "The coming together of parenting and routine posting on social networking sites has become a visible and recognisable theme and the term ‘sharenting’ has found a place in everyday talk to describe some forms of parental digital sharing practices. However, while social media has undoubtedly provided a space for parents to share experiences and receive support around parenting, sharenting remains a contestable issue. Thus, one reading of sharenting would be as a display of good parenting as mothers ‘show off’ their children as a marker of success. However, the term also can be used pejoratively to describe parental oversharing of child-focused images and content. In this paper we explore the practice of sharenting in terms of pride, affect, and the politics of digital mothering in a neoliberal context to conclude that sharenting can be best understood as a complex affective and intersectional accomplishment that produces motherhood and family as communicative activities within digital social practices.",
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Sharenting: Pride, affect and the day to day politics of digital mothering. / Lazard, Lisa; Capdevila, Rose; Dann, Charlotte Jade; Locke, Abigail; Roper, Sandra.

In: Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 06.03.2019, p. 1-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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