Should left-handed midwives and midwifery students conform to the ‘norm’ or practise intuitively?

Alison Power, Julie Quilter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It has been suggested that the proportion of left-handed people, or more specifically, the greater acknowledgement of left-handedness over the past century may be due to fewer left-handed people being ‘forced’ to use their right hand to conform to the ‘norm’, rather than a greater incidence of left-handedness (McManus, 2002). There are approximately 27,000 midwives in the UK (Royal College of Midwives (RCM), 2015); however there is no official data as to the proportion of midwives who are left-handed, nor research into whether they practise with left-handed dominance. This article was inspired by hearing the experiences in practice of first year student midwives who are left-handed. It also documents the experiences of Julie, a left-handed Senior Lecturer in Midwifery who trained in the early 1980s. Questions raised by this article include whether the left-handed student midwives of today have different experiences in practice to those of 30 years ago?; should all student midwives be trained to practise with right-handed dominance or should student midwives be supported and encouraged to practise intuitively, according to their natural dominance?
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)656-659
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Midwifery
Volume24
Issue number9
Early online date1 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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university teacher

Keywords

  • Left-handed
  • midwife
  • episiotomy
  • simulation
  • clinical practice

Cite this

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title = "Should left-handed midwives and midwifery students conform to the ‘norm’ or practise intuitively?",
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Should left-handed midwives and midwifery students conform to the ‘norm’ or practise intuitively? / Power, Alison; Quilter, Julie.

In: British Journal of Midwifery, Vol. 24, No. 9, 2016, p. 656-659.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Quilter, Julie

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