Smart cities: A Case study and Delphi approach in understanding the role of Social Enterprise Business Models toward Integrated Public Transportation

Liam Fassam, Jacquie Bridgman, Pouria Liravi

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

There is an increasing focus on integrated transportation networks being the change agent for ‘smart city’ strategies to deliver social impact. Prior research has identified growing needs to explore the roles of procurement and governance in delivering social impact through ‘smart city’ solutions (Fassam et al., 2016). Developing integrated transport solutions whether urban or rural requires horizontal governance arrangements that facilitate collaboration between private/public/third sector stakeholders (Fassam et al., 2016). However, there remains a scareceness of research exploring the creation of such governance structures and who within these ‘smart city’ schemes should lead these transformations. This research seeks to fill this gap by utilising the concept of the social enterprise and entrepreneur as an agent of change in building social capital networks (Dufays and Hubrechts, 2014), leading to the creation of governance systems that facilitate cross sectoral partnership formation. In doing so, it builds on prior research that explores collaboration in public/third sector partnerships and the role that social enterprise play in leading multi-stakeholder collaborations that minimise the cultural differences inherent in public/private/third sector partnerships (Fassam et al 2015; Hazenberg and Hall, 2016). This research paper takes a qualitative approach through a case study of an integrated transport model (UK) and leverages a Delphi study to explore the degree of fit between current business models and needs of varying stakeholders in formulating a theoretical representation of how social enterprise business models demonstrate a new way forward for integrated transformation travel.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationITS World Congress
Place of PublicationOnline
PublisherEuropean Commission
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 3 Nov 2017

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Public transportation
Business model
Social enterprise
Integrated
Delphi
Third sector
Stakeholders
Governance
Public-private
Delphi study
Governance structure
Procurement
Entrepreneurs
Leverage
Qualitative approaches
Cultural differences
Social capital
Transportation networks

Cite this

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title = "Smart cities: A Case study and Delphi approach in understanding the role of Social Enterprise Business Models toward Integrated Public Transportation",
abstract = "There is an increasing focus on integrated transportation networks being the change agent for ‘smart city’ strategies to deliver social impact. Prior research has identified growing needs to explore the roles of procurement and governance in delivering social impact through ‘smart city’ solutions (Fassam et al., 2016). Developing integrated transport solutions whether urban or rural requires horizontal governance arrangements that facilitate collaboration between private/public/third sector stakeholders (Fassam et al., 2016). However, there remains a scareceness of research exploring the creation of such governance structures and who within these ‘smart city’ schemes should lead these transformations. This research seeks to fill this gap by utilising the concept of the social enterprise and entrepreneur as an agent of change in building social capital networks (Dufays and Hubrechts, 2014), leading to the creation of governance systems that facilitate cross sectoral partnership formation. In doing so, it builds on prior research that explores collaboration in public/third sector partnerships and the role that social enterprise play in leading multi-stakeholder collaborations that minimise the cultural differences inherent in public/private/third sector partnerships (Fassam et al 2015; Hazenberg and Hall, 2016). This research paper takes a qualitative approach through a case study of an integrated transport model (UK) and leverages a Delphi study to explore the degree of fit between current business models and needs of varying stakeholders in formulating a theoretical representation of how social enterprise business models demonstrate a new way forward for integrated transformation travel.",
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Smart cities: A Case study and Delphi approach in understanding the role of Social Enterprise Business Models toward Integrated Public Transportation. / Fassam, Liam; Bridgman, Jacquie; Liravi, Pouria.

ITS World Congress. Online : European Commission, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

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AB - There is an increasing focus on integrated transportation networks being the change agent for ‘smart city’ strategies to deliver social impact. Prior research has identified growing needs to explore the roles of procurement and governance in delivering social impact through ‘smart city’ solutions (Fassam et al., 2016). Developing integrated transport solutions whether urban or rural requires horizontal governance arrangements that facilitate collaboration between private/public/third sector stakeholders (Fassam et al., 2016). However, there remains a scareceness of research exploring the creation of such governance structures and who within these ‘smart city’ schemes should lead these transformations. This research seeks to fill this gap by utilising the concept of the social enterprise and entrepreneur as an agent of change in building social capital networks (Dufays and Hubrechts, 2014), leading to the creation of governance systems that facilitate cross sectoral partnership formation. In doing so, it builds on prior research that explores collaboration in public/third sector partnerships and the role that social enterprise play in leading multi-stakeholder collaborations that minimise the cultural differences inherent in public/private/third sector partnerships (Fassam et al 2015; Hazenberg and Hall, 2016). This research paper takes a qualitative approach through a case study of an integrated transport model (UK) and leverages a Delphi study to explore the degree of fit between current business models and needs of varying stakeholders in formulating a theoretical representation of how social enterprise business models demonstrate a new way forward for integrated transformation travel.

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