The Application of Inclusive Principles and Practice in Schools in South India: Successes and Challenges

Richard Rose, Jayashree Rajanahally

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapter

Abstract

The Right to Free and Compulsory Education Act (Ministry of Human Resource Development 2009) requires that all schools in India make provision to include children who have previously been denied opportunities to formal education. Many teachers working in Indian schools have expressed their concerns that they are inadequately prepared to address the needs of a more diverse population (Soni and Rahman 2013), and that there is a need to provide greater access to professional development in this area. This chapter considers the ways in which teachers who have undertaken an accredited course focused upon inclusive education, have attempted to apply their learning within a range of school contexts in South India. Having completed a two year course, teachers were interviewed to identify changes in their practices in assessment, planning and delivery of lessons to children in their classes. The authors used data from the interviews to construct case studies and these in turn were utilised as a focus for discussion with groups of teachers in order to ascertain their perceptions of those factors which either support or inhibit changes in classroom practice.
Examples of innovative practice were identified and indicate that skills, knowledge and understanding gained through professional development have been applied and are having a positive impact in classrooms. However, in some schools there are significant challenges in disseminating these changes beyond the individual teacher who has received training in order to influence sustainable change.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEducation and Disability in the Global South
Subtitle of host publicationNew Perspectives from Africa and Asia
EditorsNidhi Singal, Paul Lynch, Shruti Taneja Johansson
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherBloomsbury
Chapter9
Pages165 - 182
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781474291217
ISBN (Print)9781474291200
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

India
teacher
school
compulsory education
classroom
human resources development
ministry
education
act
planning
interview
learning
Group

Keywords

  • Inclusive education
  • Teacher Training
  • India
  • Right to Education

Cite this

Rose, R., & Rajanahally, J. (2019). The Application of Inclusive Principles and Practice in Schools in South India: Successes and Challenges. In N. Singal, P. Lynch, & S. Taneja Johansson (Eds.), Education and Disability in the Global South: New Perspectives from Africa and Asia (pp. 165 - 182). London: Bloomsbury. https://doi.org/10.5040/9781474291231.ch-009
Rose, Richard ; Rajanahally, Jayashree. / The Application of Inclusive Principles and Practice in Schools in South India: Successes and Challenges. Education and Disability in the Global South: New Perspectives from Africa and Asia. editor / Nidhi Singal ; Paul Lynch ; Shruti Taneja Johansson. London : Bloomsbury, 2019. pp. 165 - 182
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Rose, R & Rajanahally, J 2019, The Application of Inclusive Principles and Practice in Schools in South India: Successes and Challenges. in N Singal, P Lynch & S Taneja Johansson (eds), Education and Disability in the Global South: New Perspectives from Africa and Asia. Bloomsbury, London, pp. 165 - 182. https://doi.org/10.5040/9781474291231.ch-009

The Application of Inclusive Principles and Practice in Schools in South India: Successes and Challenges. / Rose, Richard; Rajanahally, Jayashree.

Education and Disability in the Global South: New Perspectives from Africa and Asia. ed. / Nidhi Singal; Paul Lynch; Shruti Taneja Johansson. London : Bloomsbury, 2019. p. 165 - 182.

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapter

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Rose R, Rajanahally J. The Application of Inclusive Principles and Practice in Schools in South India: Successes and Challenges. In Singal N, Lynch P, Taneja Johansson S, editors, Education and Disability in the Global South: New Perspectives from Africa and Asia. London: Bloomsbury. 2019. p. 165 - 182 https://doi.org/10.5040/9781474291231.ch-009