The development of a dementia awareness training package in the Thames Valley region: an evidence based approach

Alison Ward, Jackie Parkes, M Makaza, P Zaagman, H Loveday, J Fairbain Platt

Research output: Contribution to conference typesPosterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Health Education England’s (2014) mandate stipulated that 250,000 healthcare staff required Tier 1 level dementia awareness training. In response, Health Education Thames Valley in the UK commissioned the Dementia Academic Action Group. This consortium, of University of Bedfordshire, Oxford Brookes University, University of Northampton and University of West London, reviewed dementia awareness training, identifying gaps, best practice and barriers to accessing training. This work led to the development of a training model for delivery to health & social care sectors.Method: A scoping review was undertaken to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the range of dementia awareness training currently being delivered. A mixed method approach was employed, consisting of a literature review; review of Tier 1 dementia awareness educational resources (59 training documents); stakeholder interviews (n=32); carer focus groups (n=2) and online staff survey (n=74).Results: The literature and scoping reviews and stakeholder interviews found a wide range of training available. Stakeholders reported this variety made it challenging to confidently identify training which met staff and organisational needs. The review of dementia training identified that most resources included information on signs/symptoms, types/causes, supporting people with dementia and person centred care. Information on policy, legislation and end of life care were less evident. The literature review identified ethnic diversity, learning disability and young onset dementia as gaps in training provision. The stakeholder, staff and carer findings highlighted theneed for greater information on: developing personal communication strategies; information about dementia and how to develop activities to support positive engagement. Finally, staff and stakeholders considered benefits of different training delivery styles, reporting a preference for a blended learning approach, stating this was more suited to developing dementia knowledge and skills, as opposed to a solely online format.Conclusion: Based on the findings, it was identified that there is an apparent need to develop a standard training package, which should be person centred, support enhanced communication approaches and increase understanding of coping with a diagnosis of dementia. This could prove attractive to the health & social care workforce in the Thames Valley Region, across the UK, and to the international arena.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 22 Apr 2016
Event31st International Conference of Alzheimer’s Disease International: Dementia: Global Perspective – Local Solutions - Budapest, Hungary
Duration: 22 Apr 2016 → …
http://www.alz.co.uk/ADI-conference

Conference

Conference31st International Conference of Alzheimer’s Disease International: Dementia: Global Perspective – Local Solutions
Period22/04/16 → …
Internet address

Fingerprint

Dementia
Health Education
Caregivers
Communication
Interviews
Terminal Care
Learning Disorders
Health
Focus Groups
Legislation
Practice Guidelines
England
Signs and Symptoms
Learning
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Training
  • Education
  • Health professionals

Cite this

Ward, A., Parkes, J., Makaza, M., Zaagman, P., Loveday, H., & Fairbain Platt, J. (2016). The development of a dementia awareness training package in the Thames Valley region: an evidence based approach. Poster session presented at 31st International Conference of Alzheimer’s Disease International: Dementia: Global Perspective – Local Solutions, .
Ward, Alison ; Parkes, Jackie ; Makaza, M ; Zaagman, P ; Loveday, H ; Fairbain Platt, J. / The development of a dementia awareness training package in the Thames Valley region: an evidence based approach. Poster session presented at 31st International Conference of Alzheimer’s Disease International: Dementia: Global Perspective – Local Solutions, .
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Ward, A, Parkes, J, Makaza, M, Zaagman, P, Loveday, H & Fairbain Platt, J 2016, 'The development of a dementia awareness training package in the Thames Valley region: an evidence based approach' 31st International Conference of Alzheimer’s Disease International: Dementia: Global Perspective – Local Solutions, 22/04/16, .

The development of a dementia awareness training package in the Thames Valley region: an evidence based approach. / Ward, Alison; Parkes, Jackie; Makaza, M; Zaagman, P; Loveday, H; Fairbain Platt, J.

2016. Poster session presented at 31st International Conference of Alzheimer’s Disease International: Dementia: Global Perspective – Local Solutions, .

Research output: Contribution to conference typesPosterResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - The development of a dementia awareness training package in the Thames Valley region: an evidence based approach

AU - Ward, Alison

AU - Parkes, Jackie

AU - Makaza, M

AU - Zaagman, P

AU - Loveday, H

AU - Fairbain Platt, J

PY - 2016/4/22

Y1 - 2016/4/22

N2 - Introduction: Health Education England’s (2014) mandate stipulated that 250,000 healthcare staff required Tier 1 level dementia awareness training. In response, Health Education Thames Valley in the UK commissioned the Dementia Academic Action Group. This consortium, of University of Bedfordshire, Oxford Brookes University, University of Northampton and University of West London, reviewed dementia awareness training, identifying gaps, best practice and barriers to accessing training. This work led to the development of a training model for delivery to health & social care sectors.Method: A scoping review was undertaken to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the range of dementia awareness training currently being delivered. A mixed method approach was employed, consisting of a literature review; review of Tier 1 dementia awareness educational resources (59 training documents); stakeholder interviews (n=32); carer focus groups (n=2) and online staff survey (n=74).Results: The literature and scoping reviews and stakeholder interviews found a wide range of training available. Stakeholders reported this variety made it challenging to confidently identify training which met staff and organisational needs. The review of dementia training identified that most resources included information on signs/symptoms, types/causes, supporting people with dementia and person centred care. Information on policy, legislation and end of life care were less evident. The literature review identified ethnic diversity, learning disability and young onset dementia as gaps in training provision. The stakeholder, staff and carer findings highlighted theneed for greater information on: developing personal communication strategies; information about dementia and how to develop activities to support positive engagement. Finally, staff and stakeholders considered benefits of different training delivery styles, reporting a preference for a blended learning approach, stating this was more suited to developing dementia knowledge and skills, as opposed to a solely online format.Conclusion: Based on the findings, it was identified that there is an apparent need to develop a standard training package, which should be person centred, support enhanced communication approaches and increase understanding of coping with a diagnosis of dementia. This could prove attractive to the health & social care workforce in the Thames Valley Region, across the UK, and to the international arena.

AB - Introduction: Health Education England’s (2014) mandate stipulated that 250,000 healthcare staff required Tier 1 level dementia awareness training. In response, Health Education Thames Valley in the UK commissioned the Dementia Academic Action Group. This consortium, of University of Bedfordshire, Oxford Brookes University, University of Northampton and University of West London, reviewed dementia awareness training, identifying gaps, best practice and barriers to accessing training. This work led to the development of a training model for delivery to health & social care sectors.Method: A scoping review was undertaken to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the range of dementia awareness training currently being delivered. A mixed method approach was employed, consisting of a literature review; review of Tier 1 dementia awareness educational resources (59 training documents); stakeholder interviews (n=32); carer focus groups (n=2) and online staff survey (n=74).Results: The literature and scoping reviews and stakeholder interviews found a wide range of training available. Stakeholders reported this variety made it challenging to confidently identify training which met staff and organisational needs. The review of dementia training identified that most resources included information on signs/symptoms, types/causes, supporting people with dementia and person centred care. Information on policy, legislation and end of life care were less evident. The literature review identified ethnic diversity, learning disability and young onset dementia as gaps in training provision. The stakeholder, staff and carer findings highlighted theneed for greater information on: developing personal communication strategies; information about dementia and how to develop activities to support positive engagement. Finally, staff and stakeholders considered benefits of different training delivery styles, reporting a preference for a blended learning approach, stating this was more suited to developing dementia knowledge and skills, as opposed to a solely online format.Conclusion: Based on the findings, it was identified that there is an apparent need to develop a standard training package, which should be person centred, support enhanced communication approaches and increase understanding of coping with a diagnosis of dementia. This could prove attractive to the health & social care workforce in the Thames Valley Region, across the UK, and to the international arena.

KW - Dementia

KW - Training

KW - Education

KW - Health professionals

UR - http://www.alz.co.uk/ADI-conference

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M3 - Poster

ER -

Ward A, Parkes J, Makaza M, Zaagman P, Loveday H, Fairbain Platt J. The development of a dementia awareness training package in the Thames Valley region: an evidence based approach. 2016. Poster session presented at 31st International Conference of Alzheimer’s Disease International: Dementia: Global Perspective – Local Solutions, .