The influence of assisted and resisted variable resistance back squat on subsequent counter movement jump performance

Alex Van Enis, Anthony D Kay, Anthony J Blazevich, C Kokkotis, V Sideris, Themistoklis Tsatalas, Minas A Mina

Research output: Contribution to ConferenceAbstractpeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Back squat warm-up activities using elastic band (EB) resistance in combination with free weight resistance (FWR) can improve subsequent countermovement jump (CMJ) performance (1), a phenomenon termed post-activation performance enhancement (PAPE). However, these improvements are reported using a traditional EB attachment site that creates additional downwards resistance (RES) with no data available of alternative positioning that would create upwards EB assistance (ASS). Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the influence of two EB attachment sites (RES and ASS) with FWR alone following a task-specific comprehensive warm-up on subsequent CMJ performance.

METHODS: Fifteen active males (age = 25.5 ± 3.5 y, height = 1.7 ± 6.2 m, mass = 80.5 ± 9.9 kg) volunteered to participate in this study and completed three conditions (FWR, RES, ASS) in a randomised order each separated by at least 48 h. During each condition the participants completed baseline 1 (BL1) CMJ measures and then performed a task-specific comprehensive warm-up consisting of 5 mins of cycling, two sets of 5 bodyweight squats, 5 continuous CMJs at 70% of perceived maximum and finally, maximal CMJs were performed every 30s until 3 consecutive jumps were within 3% of jump height. This was followed by baseline 2 (BL2) CMJs and participants then performed 3 back squats of either RES, ASS or FWR at 85% 1-RM with 35% of load generated during the ASS and RES EB conditions. CMJs were then performed 30 s, 4 min, 8 min and 12 min later.

RESULTS: Significant (p < 0.05) increases in the ASS condition from BL1 in jump height (4.6-11.8%) and power (3.3-8.0%) occurred at 30 s, 4 min, 8 min, 12 min and from BL2 in jump height (3.9-6.9%) and power (3.0-4.6%) at 30 s, 4 min were observed. Similar significant increases were observed in the RES condition in jump height from BL1 (4.7-10.3%) and power (2.4-6.5%) at 30 s, 4 min, 8 min, 12 min and from BL2 in jump height (4.1-5.3%) and power (2.7-4.0%) at 30 s, 4 min, 8 min. Again, significant increases were observed in the FWR condition in jump height from BL1 (4.5-9.0%) and power (3.0-5.4%) at 30 s, 4 min, 8 min and from BL2 in jump height (3.5%) and power (1.8%) but only at 30 s.

DISCUSSION: The implementation of EB variable resistance during back squats utilising either the ASS and RES attachment sites elicited greater increases in jump performance compared with the FWR condition. The different attachment methods of the EB during back squats alter the loading characteristics allowing the lifter to operate at near maximal levels for a greater proportion of the lift providing a greater stimulus, which may potentially explain the greater and prolonged increase in subsequent jump performance.

REFERENCES
1. Mina et al. (2019). Scand J Med Sci Sports. 29(3):380-392.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 23 May 2022
Event 27th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science - FIBES SEVILLA Conference Centre, Seville, Spain
Duration: 31 Aug 20222 Sep 2022
https://sport-science.org/index.php/congress/ecss-sevilla-2022

Conference

Conference 27th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science
Country/TerritorySpain
CitySeville
Period31/08/222/09/22
Internet address

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