The potential for gamma-emitting radionuclides to contribute to an understanding of erosion processes in Southern Africa

Ian D L Foster, Kate M Rowntree, John Boardman, T M Mighall

    Research output: Contribution to conference typesPaperResearch

    Abstract

    Several early studies have pointed to the fact that 137Cs could be detected in soils and sediments in Southern Africa (e.g. Kulander & Stromquist, 1989; Owens & Walling, 1996). Despite the relatively low southern hemisphere fallout of this predominantly nuclear weapons-testing derived isotope, few studies have continued to explore the potential for 137Cs and other gamma-emitting radionuclides to be used for understanding erosion processes and erosion history. For the last 9 years, we have been evaluating the potential for 137Cs and 210Pb to be used for constructing chronologies in a range of depositional environments including dryland and permanently flooded reservoirs and hillslope fan and floodout deposits. We have explored the potential for short-lived cosmogenic and other long-lived primordial nuclides to act as sediment fingerprints to aid in reconstructing changes in sediment sources in the same range of depositional environments. This paper will review the evidence to date and evaluate the potential, and limitations, of a range of gamma-emitting radionuclides to be used for understanding and managing erosion and land degradation problems in Southern Africa
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2012
    EventSouthern African Association of Geomorphologists (SAAG) Biennial Conference - Gobabeb, Namibia
    Duration: 1 Sep 2012 → …
    http://www.sasqua.net/meetings-um.htm

    Conference

    ConferenceSouthern African Association of Geomorphologists (SAAG) Biennial Conference
    Period1/09/12 → …
    Internet address

    Fingerprint

    radionuclide
    erosion
    depositional environment
    nuclear weapons testing
    sediment
    land degradation
    fallout
    hillslope
    Southern Hemisphere
    chronology
    isotope
    history
    Southern Africa
    soil

    Cite this

    Foster, I. D. L., Rowntree, K. M., Boardman, J., & Mighall, T. M. (2012). The potential for gamma-emitting radionuclides to contribute to an understanding of erosion processes in Southern Africa. Paper presented at Southern African Association of Geomorphologists (SAAG) Biennial Conference, .
    Foster, Ian D L ; Rowntree, Kate M ; Boardman, John ; Mighall, T M. / The potential for gamma-emitting radionuclides to contribute to an understanding of erosion processes in Southern Africa. Paper presented at Southern African Association of Geomorphologists (SAAG) Biennial Conference, .
    @conference{5d31accb57584e9684f9b037354461d7,
    title = "The potential for gamma-emitting radionuclides to contribute to an understanding of erosion processes in Southern Africa",
    abstract = "Several early studies have pointed to the fact that 137Cs could be detected in soils and sediments in Southern Africa (e.g. Kulander & Stromquist, 1989; Owens & Walling, 1996). Despite the relatively low southern hemisphere fallout of this predominantly nuclear weapons-testing derived isotope, few studies have continued to explore the potential for 137Cs and other gamma-emitting radionuclides to be used for understanding erosion processes and erosion history. For the last 9 years, we have been evaluating the potential for 137Cs and 210Pb to be used for constructing chronologies in a range of depositional environments including dryland and permanently flooded reservoirs and hillslope fan and floodout deposits. We have explored the potential for short-lived cosmogenic and other long-lived primordial nuclides to act as sediment fingerprints to aid in reconstructing changes in sediment sources in the same range of depositional environments. This paper will review the evidence to date and evaluate the potential, and limitations, of a range of gamma-emitting radionuclides to be used for understanding and managing erosion and land degradation problems in Southern Africa",
    author = "Foster, {Ian D L} and Rowntree, {Kate M} and John Boardman and Mighall, {T M}",
    year = "2012",
    month = "9",
    day = "1",
    language = "English",
    note = "Southern African Association of Geomorphologists (SAAG) Biennial Conference ; Conference date: 01-09-2012",
    url = "http://www.sasqua.net/meetings-um.htm",

    }

    Foster, IDL, Rowntree, KM, Boardman, J & Mighall, TM 2012, 'The potential for gamma-emitting radionuclides to contribute to an understanding of erosion processes in Southern Africa' Paper presented at Southern African Association of Geomorphologists (SAAG) Biennial Conference, 1/09/12, .

    The potential for gamma-emitting radionuclides to contribute to an understanding of erosion processes in Southern Africa. / Foster, Ian D L; Rowntree, Kate M; Boardman, John; Mighall, T M.

    2012. Paper presented at Southern African Association of Geomorphologists (SAAG) Biennial Conference, .

    Research output: Contribution to conference typesPaperResearch

    TY - CONF

    T1 - The potential for gamma-emitting radionuclides to contribute to an understanding of erosion processes in Southern Africa

    AU - Foster, Ian D L

    AU - Rowntree, Kate M

    AU - Boardman, John

    AU - Mighall, T M

    PY - 2012/9/1

    Y1 - 2012/9/1

    N2 - Several early studies have pointed to the fact that 137Cs could be detected in soils and sediments in Southern Africa (e.g. Kulander & Stromquist, 1989; Owens & Walling, 1996). Despite the relatively low southern hemisphere fallout of this predominantly nuclear weapons-testing derived isotope, few studies have continued to explore the potential for 137Cs and other gamma-emitting radionuclides to be used for understanding erosion processes and erosion history. For the last 9 years, we have been evaluating the potential for 137Cs and 210Pb to be used for constructing chronologies in a range of depositional environments including dryland and permanently flooded reservoirs and hillslope fan and floodout deposits. We have explored the potential for short-lived cosmogenic and other long-lived primordial nuclides to act as sediment fingerprints to aid in reconstructing changes in sediment sources in the same range of depositional environments. This paper will review the evidence to date and evaluate the potential, and limitations, of a range of gamma-emitting radionuclides to be used for understanding and managing erosion and land degradation problems in Southern Africa

    AB - Several early studies have pointed to the fact that 137Cs could be detected in soils and sediments in Southern Africa (e.g. Kulander & Stromquist, 1989; Owens & Walling, 1996). Despite the relatively low southern hemisphere fallout of this predominantly nuclear weapons-testing derived isotope, few studies have continued to explore the potential for 137Cs and other gamma-emitting radionuclides to be used for understanding erosion processes and erosion history. For the last 9 years, we have been evaluating the potential for 137Cs and 210Pb to be used for constructing chronologies in a range of depositional environments including dryland and permanently flooded reservoirs and hillslope fan and floodout deposits. We have explored the potential for short-lived cosmogenic and other long-lived primordial nuclides to act as sediment fingerprints to aid in reconstructing changes in sediment sources in the same range of depositional environments. This paper will review the evidence to date and evaluate the potential, and limitations, of a range of gamma-emitting radionuclides to be used for understanding and managing erosion and land degradation problems in Southern Africa

    UR - http://www.geomorph.org/sp/arch/Abstracts_Gobabeb.pdf

    UR - http://www.sasqua.net/meetings-um.htm

    M3 - Paper

    ER -

    Foster IDL, Rowntree KM, Boardman J, Mighall TM. The potential for gamma-emitting radionuclides to contribute to an understanding of erosion processes in Southern Africa. 2012. Paper presented at Southern African Association of Geomorphologists (SAAG) Biennial Conference, .