The right to say: The development of youth councils/forums within the UK

Hugh Matthews, Melanie Limb

    Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child makes explicit reference to children‘s right to say what they think about matters relating to the quality of their lives, and to have those opinions taken into account in accordance with their levels of competence and maturity. Despite the commitment of the UK Government to this and other similar initiatives designed to empower young people, a culture of non-participation is endemic within the UK in the context of environmental planning. Young people are seemingly invisible on the landscape. This paper reviews the case for children‘s active involvement in their environmental future and considers attempts to engage young people through an incipient structure of youth councils and forums.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationArea
    PublisherRoyal Geographical Society
    Pages66-78
    Number of pages13
    ISBN (Print)0004-0894
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1998

    Publication series

    NameArea
    Volume30

    Fingerprint

    environmental planning
    maturity
    UNO
    quality of life
    commitment

    Cite this

    Matthews, Hugh ; Limb, Melanie. / The right to say: The development of youth councils/forums within the UK. Area. Royal Geographical Society, 1998. pp. 66-78 (Area).
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    The right to say: The development of youth councils/forums within the UK. / Matthews, Hugh; Limb, Melanie.

    Area. Royal Geographical Society, 1998. p. 66-78 (Area; Vol. 30).

    Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

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