Time travel, kaleidoscopes and a hat shop

Research output: Contribution to Book/ReportChapter

Abstract

In this chapter you will find: Some existing models and ideas about the identities and roles of a reception teacher, along with some new ways of looking at the roles to support a personally negotiated understanding. Drawing on Bronfenbrenner’s theory, receptions teachers are located in the multi-layered ecological systems. Maslow’s hierarchy of needs inspired the ‘hierarchy of the heart and the head’ model, which identifies essential attributes of reception teachers. Reception teachers’ identities and roles are also examined in the context of a child-centred pedagogical approach and care-full practice where professional love for children has its place. Finally, this chapter is concluded by a discussion of the social construction of the teaching role that is unique to this age group and the different hats teachers wear in line with the different roles they fulfil in children’s daily lives.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Multiple Identities of the Reception Teacher: Pedagogy and Purpose
EditorsAnna Cox, Gillian Sykes
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherSage
Chapter1
Pages1-13
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9781473959521
Publication statusPublished - 9 Jul 2016

Fingerprint

travel
teacher
ecological system
social construction
age group
love
time
Teaching

Keywords

  • Early years
  • Reception teaching
  • pedagogy
  • teacher professionalism

Cite this

Cox, A., & Teszenyi, E. (2016). Time travel, kaleidoscopes and a hat shop. In A. Cox, & G. Sykes (Eds.), The Multiple Identities of the Reception Teacher: Pedagogy and Purpose (pp. 1-13). London: Sage.
Cox, Anna ; Teszenyi, Eleonora. / Time travel, kaleidoscopes and a hat shop. The Multiple Identities of the Reception Teacher: Pedagogy and Purpose. editor / Anna Cox ; Gillian Sykes. London : Sage, 2016. pp. 1-13
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Cox, A & Teszenyi, E 2016, Time travel, kaleidoscopes and a hat shop. in A Cox & G Sykes (eds), The Multiple Identities of the Reception Teacher: Pedagogy and Purpose. Sage, London, pp. 1-13.

Time travel, kaleidoscopes and a hat shop. / Cox, Anna; Teszenyi, Eleonora.

The Multiple Identities of the Reception Teacher: Pedagogy and Purpose. ed. / Anna Cox; Gillian Sykes. London : Sage, 2016. p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to Book/ReportChapter

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AB - In this chapter you will find: Some existing models and ideas about the identities and roles of a reception teacher, along with some new ways of looking at the roles to support a personally negotiated understanding. Drawing on Bronfenbrenner’s theory, receptions teachers are located in the multi-layered ecological systems. Maslow’s hierarchy of needs inspired the ‘hierarchy of the heart and the head’ model, which identifies essential attributes of reception teachers. Reception teachers’ identities and roles are also examined in the context of a child-centred pedagogical approach and care-full practice where professional love for children has its place. Finally, this chapter is concluded by a discussion of the social construction of the teaching role that is unique to this age group and the different hats teachers wear in line with the different roles they fulfil in children’s daily lives.

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Cox A, Teszenyi E. Time travel, kaleidoscopes and a hat shop. In Cox A, Sykes G, editors, The Multiple Identities of the Reception Teacher: Pedagogy and Purpose. London: Sage. 2016. p. 1-13