Universal difference? Understanding relationality and difference in transpersonal psychotherapy

Dwight Turner, Jane Callaghan, Alasdair Gordon-Finlayson, Kevin Buchanan

Research output: Contribution to conference typesPaperResearch

Abstract

As a working class, black, male, who is the son of immigrants who travelled from the Caribbean with the Windrush Generation, I often feel at odds with my psychotherapy profession, dominated as it is by middle class, white, women, who typically have a British family line flowing back generations. My sense of otherness is with me throughout my working day, in my psychotherapy practice, as I sit with a diverse range of clients within the complex context of contemporary ‘multicultural’ Britain. The sense of ‘the other’, the sense of myself as ‘other’ impacts on, and to some degree constitutes therapeutic relationality. Within most styles of psychotherapy difference is mainly understood in terms of the acknowledgement of the various categories, consideration of power imbalances, which we try as therapists to work with, work around, work through. But I am a transpersonal psychotherapist, and within this modality, there is very little consideration of ‘difference’, or otherness, except to highlight the apparent universality of us all. In this paper, we will explore ways of carving out a space within transpersonal ways of thinking to consider the relational context of therapy, and to explore the constitution of ‘othering’ within this transpersonal therapeutic context. This paper outlines how the use of creative techniques common to Transpersonal psychotherapy, such as visualisations, drawing, and Sand Tray work can be used in research on therapy to explore the emotional bodily and relational experience of difference, between therapist and client, and between researcher and researched
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 5 Sep 2013
EventBritish Psychological Society's Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section (QMiP) Conference 2013 - Huddersfield University
Duration: 5 Sep 2013 → …
http://www.bps.org.uk/qmip2013

Conference

ConferenceBritish Psychological Society's Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section (QMiP) Conference 2013
Period5/09/13 → …
Internet address

Fingerprint

psychotherapy
foreignness
therapist
psychotherapist
working class
visualization
middle class
constitution
profession
immigrant
experience

Keywords

  • Difference
  • the other
  • Jung
  • creativity
  • research

Cite this

Turner, D., Callaghan, J., Gordon-Finlayson, A., & Buchanan, K. (2013). Universal difference? Understanding relationality and difference in transpersonal psychotherapy. Paper presented at British Psychological Society's Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section (QMiP) Conference 2013, .
Turner, Dwight ; Callaghan, Jane ; Gordon-Finlayson, Alasdair ; Buchanan, Kevin. / Universal difference? Understanding relationality and difference in transpersonal psychotherapy. Paper presented at British Psychological Society's Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section (QMiP) Conference 2013, .
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Turner, D, Callaghan, J, Gordon-Finlayson, A & Buchanan, K 2013, 'Universal difference? Understanding relationality and difference in transpersonal psychotherapy' Paper presented at British Psychological Society's Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section (QMiP) Conference 2013, 5/09/13, .

Universal difference? Understanding relationality and difference in transpersonal psychotherapy. / Turner, Dwight; Callaghan, Jane; Gordon-Finlayson, Alasdair; Buchanan, Kevin.

2013. Paper presented at British Psychological Society's Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section (QMiP) Conference 2013, .

Research output: Contribution to conference typesPaperResearch

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Turner D, Callaghan J, Gordon-Finlayson A, Buchanan K. Universal difference? Understanding relationality and difference in transpersonal psychotherapy. 2013. Paper presented at British Psychological Society's Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section (QMiP) Conference 2013, .