Urgent Messages

Direct messages from the ORC

Alexis Taylor (Designer)

    Research output: Non-textual form typesExhibitionResearch

    Abstract

    In the Osborne Robinson Poster Collection, the University of Northampton owns one of the largest and most varied poster and printed ephemera collections in the country.
    In early 2017 an exhibition held at Avenue Gallery (University of Northampton) was curated to specifically showcase clear and direct graphic communication in an attempt to reappraise the power of printed material as a means of mass-communication in the internet age. Pieces designed with ruthless graphic efficiency, with little room for exposition or explanation sat alongside others almost majestic in their illustrative beauty. Each exhibit was selected for its ability to distil disparate and sometimes desperate social and political issues into singular, powerful visual statements. Unlike the internet, printed matter navigates to us. A poster or handbill stops us in the street. They do not need a power source or a broadband signal, a like, a re-tweet or a share. They get in our way; they reside in the community, not just within social media echo chambers. You can’t swipe a poster left or right, or up and down. Using the posters as a point of departure, first year Graphic Communication students then reacted to issues they considered urgent (pollution; conflict; poverty etc), creating a series of printed and digital works which were displayed in the same gallery space.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 16 Jan 2019

    Fingerprint

    Northampton
    Communication
    World Wide Web
    Social Issues
    Exposition
    Poverty
    Social Media
    Pollution
    Ephemera
    Mass Communication
    Political Issues
    Showcase
    Digital Works

    Cite this

    Taylor, A. (Designer). (2019). Urgent Messages: Direct messages from the ORC. Exhibition
    Taylor, Alexis (Designer). / Urgent Messages : Direct messages from the ORC. [Exhibition].
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    abstract = "In the Osborne Robinson Poster Collection, the University of Northampton owns one of the largest and most varied poster and printed ephemera collections in the country.In early 2017 an exhibition held at Avenue Gallery (University of Northampton) was curated to specifically showcase clear and direct graphic communication in an attempt to reappraise the power of printed material as a means of mass-communication in the internet age. Pieces designed with ruthless graphic efficiency, with little room for exposition or explanation sat alongside others almost majestic in their illustrative beauty. Each exhibit was selected for its ability to distil disparate and sometimes desperate social and political issues into singular, powerful visual statements. Unlike the internet, printed matter navigates to us. A poster or handbill stops us in the street. They do not need a power source or a broadband signal, a like, a re-tweet or a share. They get in our way; they reside in the community, not just within social media echo chambers. You can’t swipe a poster left or right, or up and down. Using the posters as a point of departure, first year Graphic Communication students then reacted to issues they considered urgent (pollution; conflict; poverty etc), creating a series of printed and digital works which were displayed in the same gallery space.",
    author = "Alexis Taylor",
    year = "2019",
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    Taylor, A, Urgent Messages: Direct messages from the ORC, 2019, Exhibition.
    Urgent Messages : Direct messages from the ORC. Taylor, Alexis (Designer). 2019.

    Research output: Non-textual form typesExhibitionResearch

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