Use of wide-screen, high-definition monitors for improving adenoma detection: A prospective, randomized, controlled trial

Douglas Mills, Tilemahos Spyratos, Ali Haider, Suela Sulo, Timothy Laurie

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Colonoscopy is sensitive at detecting large polyps; however, a significant polyp miss rate is still recognized. Indicators such as the adenoma detection rate (ADR) and more recently, the adenoma per colonoscopy rate (APC) are increasingly used to ensure quality in colonoscopy. We performed a prospective, randomized, controlled study evaluating improvement in adenoma detection between wide-screen, high-definition (WSHD) monitors compared to standard monitors (SD). METHODS: Patients undergoing screening or surveillance colonoscopy were randomized to a WSHD room or SD. Polyp size, location, shape, and histology was recorded. Right-sided polyps were considered to be those proximal to the splenic flexure. RESULTS: A total of 152 patients were enrolled in the study, with 78 (51.3%) and 74 (48.7%) enrolled in the WSHD and SD groups, respectively. A 10% absolute difference in favor of the WSHD group was noted for the ADR (41% vs. 31% patients); however, the difference was statistically not significant. In the WSHD and SD groups, APCs of 0.9 +/- 1.4 versus 0.7 +/- 1.4 (p = 0.49) were noted, respectively. For polyps less than 5 mm, an ADR of 0.3 +/- 0.4 versus 0.2 +/- 0.4 (p = 0.34) and APC of 0.5 +/- 1.1 versus 0.2 +/- 0.5 (p = 0.06) were seen in the WSHD and SD groups. CONCLUSION: This study shows a trend toward improvement in ADR, with an increase in the APC for small adenomas that approaches statistical significance. WSHD monitors are a one time, low cost intervention for improving the quality of colonoscopy with potentially favorable outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDigestive Endoscopy
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
Pages577-582
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)0002-9270
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2016

Publication series

NameDigestive Endoscopy
Volume28

Fingerprint

Adenoma
Colonoscopy
Randomized Controlled Trials
Polyps
Transverse Colon
Histology
Costs and Cost Analysis

Cite this

Mills, D., Spyratos, T., Haider, A., Sulo, S., & Laurie, T. (2016). Use of wide-screen, high-definition monitors for improving adenoma detection: A prospective, randomized, controlled trial. In Digestive Endoscopy (pp. 577-582). (Digestive Endoscopy; Vol. 28). Blackwell Publishing Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1111/den.12667
Mills, Douglas ; Spyratos, Tilemahos ; Haider, Ali ; Sulo, Suela ; Laurie, Timothy. / Use of wide-screen, high-definition monitors for improving adenoma detection: A prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Digestive Endoscopy. Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2016. pp. 577-582 (Digestive Endoscopy).
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Mills, D, Spyratos, T, Haider, A, Sulo, S & Laurie, T 2016, Use of wide-screen, high-definition monitors for improving adenoma detection: A prospective, randomized, controlled trial. in Digestive Endoscopy. Digestive Endoscopy, vol. 28, Blackwell Publishing Ltd, pp. 577-582. https://doi.org/10.1111/den.12667

Use of wide-screen, high-definition monitors for improving adenoma detection: A prospective, randomized, controlled trial. / Mills, Douglas; Spyratos, Tilemahos; Haider, Ali; Sulo, Suela; Laurie, Timothy.

Digestive Endoscopy. Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2016. p. 577-582 (Digestive Endoscopy; Vol. 28).

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Use of wide-screen, high-definition monitors for improving adenoma detection: A prospective, randomized, controlled trial

AU - Mills, Douglas

AU - Spyratos, Tilemahos

AU - Haider, Ali

AU - Sulo, Suela

AU - Laurie, Timothy

PY - 2016/7/1

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: Colonoscopy is sensitive at detecting large polyps; however, a significant polyp miss rate is still recognized. Indicators such as the adenoma detection rate (ADR) and more recently, the adenoma per colonoscopy rate (APC) are increasingly used to ensure quality in colonoscopy. We performed a prospective, randomized, controlled study evaluating improvement in adenoma detection between wide-screen, high-definition (WSHD) monitors compared to standard monitors (SD). METHODS: Patients undergoing screening or surveillance colonoscopy were randomized to a WSHD room or SD. Polyp size, location, shape, and histology was recorded. Right-sided polyps were considered to be those proximal to the splenic flexure. RESULTS: A total of 152 patients were enrolled in the study, with 78 (51.3%) and 74 (48.7%) enrolled in the WSHD and SD groups, respectively. A 10% absolute difference in favor of the WSHD group was noted for the ADR (41% vs. 31% patients); however, the difference was statistically not significant. In the WSHD and SD groups, APCs of 0.9 +/- 1.4 versus 0.7 +/- 1.4 (p = 0.49) were noted, respectively. For polyps less than 5 mm, an ADR of 0.3 +/- 0.4 versus 0.2 +/- 0.4 (p = 0.34) and APC of 0.5 +/- 1.1 versus 0.2 +/- 0.5 (p = 0.06) were seen in the WSHD and SD groups. CONCLUSION: This study shows a trend toward improvement in ADR, with an increase in the APC for small adenomas that approaches statistical significance. WSHD monitors are a one time, low cost intervention for improving the quality of colonoscopy with potentially favorable outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Colonoscopy is sensitive at detecting large polyps; however, a significant polyp miss rate is still recognized. Indicators such as the adenoma detection rate (ADR) and more recently, the adenoma per colonoscopy rate (APC) are increasingly used to ensure quality in colonoscopy. We performed a prospective, randomized, controlled study evaluating improvement in adenoma detection between wide-screen, high-definition (WSHD) monitors compared to standard monitors (SD). METHODS: Patients undergoing screening or surveillance colonoscopy were randomized to a WSHD room or SD. Polyp size, location, shape, and histology was recorded. Right-sided polyps were considered to be those proximal to the splenic flexure. RESULTS: A total of 152 patients were enrolled in the study, with 78 (51.3%) and 74 (48.7%) enrolled in the WSHD and SD groups, respectively. A 10% absolute difference in favor of the WSHD group was noted for the ADR (41% vs. 31% patients); however, the difference was statistically not significant. In the WSHD and SD groups, APCs of 0.9 +/- 1.4 versus 0.7 +/- 1.4 (p = 0.49) were noted, respectively. For polyps less than 5 mm, an ADR of 0.3 +/- 0.4 versus 0.2 +/- 0.4 (p = 0.34) and APC of 0.5 +/- 1.1 versus 0.2 +/- 0.5 (p = 0.06) were seen in the WSHD and SD groups. CONCLUSION: This study shows a trend toward improvement in ADR, with an increase in the APC for small adenomas that approaches statistical significance. WSHD monitors are a one time, low cost intervention for improving the quality of colonoscopy with potentially favorable outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/widescreen-highdefinition-monitors-improving-adenoma-detection-prospective-randomized-controlled-tri

U2 - 10.1111/den.12667

DO - 10.1111/den.12667

M3 - Chapter

SN - 0002-9270

T3 - Digestive Endoscopy

SP - 577

EP - 582

BT - Digestive Endoscopy

PB - Blackwell Publishing Ltd

ER -

Mills D, Spyratos T, Haider A, Sulo S, Laurie T. Use of wide-screen, high-definition monitors for improving adenoma detection: A prospective, randomized, controlled trial. In Digestive Endoscopy. Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2016. p. 577-582. (Digestive Endoscopy). https://doi.org/10.1111/den.12667