Using environmental radionuclides, mineral magnetism and sediment geochemistry for tracing and dating fine fluvial sediments

Des Walling, Ian Foster

    Research output: Contribution to Book/ReportChapterpeer-review

    Abstract

    This chapter focuses on the measurements (the tools), namely gamma‐emitting radionuclides, environmental magnetism and sediment geochemistry. By studying the post‐fallout redistribution and fate of these fallout radionuclides, it is possible to obtain essentially unique information on soil and sediment redistribution and, therefore, on erosion and deposition rates. The chapter reviews the various approaches that can be used to obtain information on sediment source. The set of sediment properties to be included in a composite fingerprint is frequently selected empirically. The chapter presents a case study illustrating combining fallout radionuclide measurements and sediment source fingerprinting for sediment budgeting: Pang and Lambourn Catchments, United Kingdom. The tools are often used by geomorphologists to date recent sedimentary deposits, document rates of soil and sediment redistribution, establish sediment sources, generate sediment budgets and reconstruct the functioning of past sediment systems.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationTools in Fluvial Geomorphology
    EditorsG. Mathias Kondolf, Hervé Piégay
    Place of PublicationChichester
    PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Ltd
    Chapter9
    Pages183-209
    Number of pages27
    Edition2nd
    ISBN (Electronic)9781118648551
    ISBN (Print)9780470684054
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 3 Jun 2016

    Publication series

    NameTools in Fluvial Geomorphology

    Keywords

    • environmental magnetism
    • gamma‐emitting radionuclides
    • sediment budgets
    • sediment geochemistry
    • sediment redistribution
    • information sediment
    • source fingerprinting

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