Working for the family

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Recent writing about the ‘service encounter’ suggests that high-quality service requires employee commitment and this will involve a more developed and sophisticated approach to HRM than has traditionally characterised the sector. Through an in-depth study of a sample of high service level hotels in the US and UK this paper argues, in contrast, that commitment can be created through a workplace culture that draws on family discourses and practices. It explores the ways in which this culture is developed and endorsed by both management and employees. This approach to generating commitment has costs in terms of the time and priority employees can give to their ‘real’ friends and family. By drawing on the highly gendered and hierarchical organisation of the family, it is argued that culture also contributes to gender stereotyping and hierarchies within and outside the workplace in ways that limit women's career opportunities
Original languageEnglish
JournalHuman Resource Management Journal
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2007

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Work place
Employees
Hotels
Employee commitment
Costs
Service levels
Discourse
Stereotyping
Service encounter
Service employees
Hierarchical organization

Cite this

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Working for the family. / MacDonald, Sandy; Liff, S.

In: Human Resource Management Journal, Vol. 17, No. 2, 01.04.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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