Young adult language brokers’ and teachers’ views of the advantages and disadvantages of brokering in school

Sarah Crafter, Tony Cline, Evangelia Prokopiou

Research output: Contribution to Book/ReportChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Schools have been cited as some of the most frequent venues where children and young people act as language brokers. Respondents from both the two groups who were interviewed framed the advantages and disadvantages according to what they thought language brokering had offered in terms of efficiency and parental preferences. The literature on child language brokering presents a mixed picture with respect to the impacts it may have on social and emotional development. Acting as a translator for others puts a person’s language proficiency and social skills on display. The social dynamics of a school community operate in complex ways for those who accept a role that cuts across the usual networks. The chapter examines how key stakeholders viewed the impact that engagement in child language brokering activities has on a young person’s identity and social development. It also examines what participants had to say about the longer-term impact of experiences of language brokering at school.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLanguage Brokering in Immigrant Families
Subtitle of host publicationTheories and Contexts
EditorsRobert S Weisskirch
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge, Taylor & Francis Group
Chapter11
Pages224-243
Number of pages20
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781315644714
ISBN (Print)9781138185111, 9781138185142
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Mar 2017

Keywords

  • Language brokering
  • Young adult language brokers

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