Barchan dunes: Why they cannot be treated as 'solitons' or 'solitary waves'

Ian Livingstone, Giles F.S. Wiggs, Matthew Baddock

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

    Abstract

    Schwämmle and Herrmann (Nature, 2003, vol. 426, p. 619) have suggested that two subaerial barchan sand dunes could ‘pass through one another while still preserving their shape’ in a manner similar to solitons or solitary waves. A wide range of published field and wind tunnel evidence suggests that this assertion should not go unchallenged.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)255-257
    Number of pages3
    JournalEarth Surface Processes and Landforms
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2005

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    barchan
    solitary wave
    wind tunnel
    dune
    evidence

    Keywords

    • Aeolian
    • Barchan dune
    • Geomorphology
    • Soliton

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Schw{\"a}mmle and Herrmann (Nature, 2003, vol. 426, p. 619) have suggested that two subaerial barchan sand dunes could ‘pass through one another while still preserving their shape’ in a manner similar to solitons or solitary waves. A wide range of published field and wind tunnel evidence suggests that this assertion should not go unchallenged.",
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    journal = "Earth Surface Processes and Landforms",
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    Barchan dunes: Why they cannot be treated as 'solitons' or 'solitary waves'. / Livingstone, Ian; Wiggs, Giles F.S.; Baddock, Matthew.

    In: Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 02.2005, p. 255-257.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

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    AU - Livingstone, Ian

    AU - Wiggs, Giles F.S.

    AU - Baddock, Matthew

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    AB - Schwämmle and Herrmann (Nature, 2003, vol. 426, p. 619) have suggested that two subaerial barchan sand dunes could ‘pass through one another while still preserving their shape’ in a manner similar to solitons or solitary waves. A wide range of published field and wind tunnel evidence suggests that this assertion should not go unchallenged.

    KW - Aeolian

    KW - Barchan dune

    KW - Geomorphology

    KW - Soliton

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    JO - Earth Surface Processes and Landforms

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