Exploring outcome measures with cognitive stimulation therapies and how these relate to the experiences of people with dementia: A narrative literature review

Alison Ward, Diana Schack Thoft, Ann Lykkegaard Sorensen

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A narrative literature review was undertaken to consider the outcome measures used in research on cognitive stimulation therapy (CST), cognitive training (CT), and cognitive stimulation (CS) interventions. This review extends findings from previous reviews by including a broad range of study methodologies, both qualitative and quantitative, and explored whether participant experiences of taking part in the research are discussed. A database search identified 1,261 articles matching the search criteria, with 29 included in this review. Studies tended to use the manualised CST model, with 11 other models identified. Randomised control trials were chosen as the most used method to explore impact. Across the studies, 65 different outcome measures were used with people with dementia, and only four studies used a qualitative approach. Little information is provided on the assessment process in terms of time taken, assessor, or of the experience of the person with dementia. There is heterogeneity of measures used, within and across domains, and number, and agreement or consistency of measures would provide greater comparability across CS studies. Gaps in reporting were noted on the detail of the assessment process and the experience of people with dementia taking part in this research.
Original languageEnglish
JournalDementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 29 Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • outcome measures
  • Validated Measures
  • cognitive training
  • cognitive stimulation therapy
  • cognitive simulation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Exploring outcome measures with cognitive stimulation therapies and how these relate to the experiences of people with dementia: A narrative literature review'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this