Pregnancy rates after slow-release insemination (SRI) and standard bolus intrauterine insemination (IUI) – A multicentre randomised, controlled trial

Julian Marschalek, Christian Egarter, Elisabeth Vytiska-Binsdorfer, Andreas Obruca, Jackie Campbell, Philip Harris, Maarten van Santen, Bernd Lesoine, Johannes Ott, Maximilian Franz*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

Abstract

This multicentre, randomised, controlled cross-over trial was designed to investigate the effect of intrauterine slow-release insemination (SRI) on pregnancy rates in women with confirmed infertility or the need for semen donation who were eligible for standard bolus intra-uterine insemination (IUI). Data for a total of 182 women were analysed after randomisation to receive IUI (n = 96) or SRI (n = 86) first. The primary outcome was serological pregnancy defined by a positive beta human chorionic gonadotropin test, two weeks after insemination. Patients who did not conceive after the first cycle switched to the
alternative technique for the second cycle: 44 women switched to IUI and 58 switched to SRI. In total, there were 284 treatment cycles (IUI: n = 140; SRI: n = 144). Pregnancy rates following SRI and IUI were 13.2% and 10.0%, respectively, which was not statistically significant (p = 0.202). A statistically significant difference in pregnancy rates for SRI versus IUI was detected in women aged under 35 years. In this subgroup, the pregnancy rate with SRI was 17% compared to 7% with IUI (relative risk 2.33; p = 0.032) across both cycles. These results support the hypothesis that the pregnancy rate might be improved with SRI compared to standard bolus IUI, especially in women aged under 35 years
Original languageEnglish
Article number7719
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalScientific Reports
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 May 2020

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