Reconciling Ecological Processes with Phylogenetic Patterns: The Apparent Paradox of Plant--Pollinator Systems

    Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    To what extent do studies of the ecology of mutualistic interactions inform us about the evolution of such relationships? As I will show below, the evolution of floral diversity seems to be based upon specialized relationships with pollinators, yet (with some obvious exceptions) the majority of angiosperms appear to be promiscuously pollinated by a range of texa
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationThe Journal of Ecology
    Pages767
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 1996

    Publication series

    NameThe Journal of Ecology
    Volume84

    Fingerprint

    pollinator
    phylogenetics
    angiosperm
    ecology

    Cite this

    @inbook{a0185c0420e744e793388617b70fb0e8,
    title = "Reconciling Ecological Processes with Phylogenetic Patterns: The Apparent Paradox of Plant--Pollinator Systems",
    abstract = "To what extent do studies of the ecology of mutualistic interactions inform us about the evolution of such relationships? As I will show below, the evolution of floral diversity seems to be based upon specialized relationships with pollinators, yet (with some obvious exceptions) the majority of angiosperms appear to be promiscuously pollinated by a range of texa",
    author = "Jeff Ollerton",
    year = "1996",
    month = "10",
    doi = "10.2307/2261338",
    language = "English",
    isbn = "0022-0477",
    series = "The Journal of Ecology",
    pages = "767",
    booktitle = "The Journal of Ecology",

    }

    Reconciling Ecological Processes with Phylogenetic Patterns: The Apparent Paradox of Plant--Pollinator Systems. / Ollerton, Jeff.

    The Journal of Ecology. 1996. p. 767 (The Journal of Ecology; Vol. 84).

    Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

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