Sameness or difference? Exploring girls' use of recreational spaces

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Recent publications within childhood studies have advocated the use of the concept of generation in understanding children's everyday lives. In this paper meanings of generation are explored and the benefit of such an approach to childhood research is debated. Drawing upon recent research with a cohort of teenage girls in rural south Northamptonshire, it is shown that what may appear from an adult perspective as a zone of 'sameness' may, from a young person's point of view, be a realm of difference and diversity. It is argued that childhood research which 'looks up' from young people's perspectives can illuminate important issues and generate valuable data for studies of specific generations. Recent publications within childhood studies have advocated the use of the concept of generation in understanding children's everyday lives. In this paper meanings of generation are explored and the benefit of such an approach to childhood research is debated. Drawing upon recent research with a cohort of teenage girls in rural south Northamptonshire, it is shown that what may appear from an adult perspective as a zone of 'sameness' may, from a young person's point of view, be a realm of difference and diversity. It is argued that childhood research which 'looks up' from young people's perspectives can illuminate important issues and generate valuable data for studies of specific generations.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)111-124
    Number of pages14
    JournalChildren's Geographies
    Volume1
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

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    title = "Sameness or difference? Exploring girls' use of recreational spaces",
    abstract = "Recent publications within childhood studies have advocated the use of the concept of generation in understanding children's everyday lives. In this paper meanings of generation are explored and the benefit of such an approach to childhood research is debated. Drawing upon recent research with a cohort of teenage girls in rural south Northamptonshire, it is shown that what may appear from an adult perspective as a zone of 'sameness' may, from a young person's point of view, be a realm of difference and diversity. It is argued that childhood research which 'looks up' from young people's perspectives can illuminate important issues and generate valuable data for studies of specific generations. Recent publications within childhood studies have advocated the use of the concept of generation in understanding children's everyday lives. In this paper meanings of generation are explored and the benefit of such an approach to childhood research is debated. Drawing upon recent research with a cohort of teenage girls in rural south Northamptonshire, it is shown that what may appear from an adult perspective as a zone of 'sameness' may, from a young person's point of view, be a realm of difference and diversity. It is argued that childhood research which 'looks up' from young people's perspectives can illuminate important issues and generate valuable data for studies of specific generations.",
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    Sameness or difference? Exploring girls' use of recreational spaces. / Tucker, Faith.

    In: Children's Geographies, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2003, p. 111-124.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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