Diversity of Diptera families that pollinate Ceropegia (Apocynaceae) trap flowers: an update in light of new data and phylogenetic analyses

Jeff Ollerton, S Dötterl, K Ghorpadé, A Heiduk, S Liede-Schumann, S Masinde, U Meve, C I Peter, S Prieto-Benítez, S Punekar, M Thulin, A Whittington

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Pollination by flies (Diptera) has been important to the diversification and ecology of the flowering plants, but is poorly understood in contrast to pollination by other groups such as bees, butterflies and birds. Within the Apocynaceae the genera Ceropegia and Riocreuxia temporarily trap flies, releasing them after a fixed, speciesspecific period of time, during which pollination and/or pollen removal occurs. This “trap flower” pollination system shows convergent evolution with unrelated species in other families and fascinated Stefan Vogel for much of his career, leading to groundbreaking work on floral function in Ceropegia (Apocynaceae). In this new study we extend the work of the latest broad analysis published by some of the authors (Ollerton et al., 2009 – Annals of Botany). This incorporates previously unpublished data from India and Africa, as well as recently published information, on the diversity of pollinators exploited by Ceropegia. The analyses are based on a more accurate phylogenetic understanding of the relationships between the major groups, and significantly widens the biogeographic scope of our understanding of fly pollination within Ceropegia. Information about the pollinators of 69 taxa (species, subspecies and natural varieties) of Ceropegia is now available. Twenty five families of Diptera are known to visit the flowers of Ceropegia, of which sixteen are confirmed as pollinators. Most taxa are pollinated by species from a single family. Overall, there were no major biogeographic differences in the types of Diptera that were used in particular regions, though some subtle differences were apparent. Likewise there were no differences between the two major clades of Ceropegia, but clear differences when comparing the range of Diptera exploited by Ceropegia with that of the stapeliads. This clade, one of the largest in the Asclepiadoideae, is a fascinating example of a species radiation driven by an apparently relatively uniform set of pollinators.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalFlora
    Volume234
    Early online date27 Jul 2017
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2017

    Fingerprint

    Ceropegia
    Apocynaceae
    traps
    flowers
    phylogeny
    pollinating insects
    pollination
    convergent evolution
    botany
    butterflies
    Apoidea
    Angiospermae
    pollen
    ecology
    India

    Keywords

    • Apocynaceae
    • Asclepiadoideae
    • Ceropegia
    • Diptera
    • flower evolution
    • pollination
    • specialisation
    • Ceropegieae-Stapeliinae

    Cite this

    Ollerton, Jeff ; Dötterl, S ; Ghorpadé, K ; Heiduk, A ; Liede-Schumann, S ; Masinde, S ; Meve, U ; Peter, C I ; Prieto-Benítez, S ; Punekar, S ; Thulin, M ; Whittington, A. / Diversity of Diptera families that pollinate Ceropegia (Apocynaceae) trap flowers: an update in light of new data and phylogenetic analyses. In: Flora. 2017 ; Vol. 234.
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    abstract = "Pollination by flies (Diptera) has been important to the diversification and ecology of the flowering plants, but is poorly understood in contrast to pollination by other groups such as bees, butterflies and birds. Within the Apocynaceae the genera Ceropegia and Riocreuxia temporarily trap flies, releasing them after a fixed, speciesspecific period of time, during which pollination and/or pollen removal occurs. This “trap flower” pollination system shows convergent evolution with unrelated species in other families and fascinated Stefan Vogel for much of his career, leading to groundbreaking work on floral function in Ceropegia (Apocynaceae). In this new study we extend the work of the latest broad analysis published by some of the authors (Ollerton et al., 2009 – Annals of Botany). This incorporates previously unpublished data from India and Africa, as well as recently published information, on the diversity of pollinators exploited by Ceropegia. The analyses are based on a more accurate phylogenetic understanding of the relationships between the major groups, and significantly widens the biogeographic scope of our understanding of fly pollination within Ceropegia. Information about the pollinators of 69 taxa (species, subspecies and natural varieties) of Ceropegia is now available. Twenty five families of Diptera are known to visit the flowers of Ceropegia, of which sixteen are confirmed as pollinators. Most taxa are pollinated by species from a single family. Overall, there were no major biogeographic differences in the types of Diptera that were used in particular regions, though some subtle differences were apparent. Likewise there were no differences between the two major clades of Ceropegia, but clear differences when comparing the range of Diptera exploited by Ceropegia with that of the stapeliads. This clade, one of the largest in the Asclepiadoideae, is a fascinating example of a species radiation driven by an apparently relatively uniform set of pollinators.",
    keywords = "Apocynaceae, Asclepiadoideae, Ceropegia, Diptera, flower evolution, pollination, specialisation, Ceropegieae-Stapeliinae",
    author = "Jeff Ollerton and S D{\"o}tterl and K Ghorpad{\'e} and A Heiduk and S Liede-Schumann and S Masinde and U Meve and Peter, {C I} and S Prieto-Ben{\'i}tez and S Punekar and M Thulin and A Whittington",
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    Ollerton, J, Dötterl, S, Ghorpadé, K, Heiduk, A, Liede-Schumann, S, Masinde, S, Meve, U, Peter, CI, Prieto-Benítez, S, Punekar, S, Thulin, M & Whittington, A 2017, 'Diversity of Diptera families that pollinate Ceropegia (Apocynaceae) trap flowers: an update in light of new data and phylogenetic analyses', Flora, vol. 234. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.flora.2017.07.013

    Diversity of Diptera families that pollinate Ceropegia (Apocynaceae) trap flowers: an update in light of new data and phylogenetic analyses. / Ollerton, Jeff; Dötterl, S; Ghorpadé, K; Heiduk, A; Liede-Schumann, S; Masinde, S; Meve, U; Peter, C I; Prieto-Benítez, S; Punekar, S; Thulin, M; Whittington, A.

    In: Flora, Vol. 234, 01.09.2017.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    T1 - Diversity of Diptera families that pollinate Ceropegia (Apocynaceae) trap flowers: an update in light of new data and phylogenetic analyses

    AU - Ollerton, Jeff

    AU - Dötterl, S

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    AU - Heiduk, A

    AU - Liede-Schumann, S

    AU - Masinde, S

    AU - Meve, U

    AU - Peter, C I

    AU - Prieto-Benítez, S

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    AU - Thulin, M

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